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WAN Undercover Investigator Sam Jojola Talks Rhino Horn Trafficking, Irish Gang Under Investigation For Killing White Rhino In French Zoo & Solutions

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By Sam Jojola

Originally posted at WAN

 

In 1990, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Special Agent colleague and I worked in Nevada on a mid-west based suspect offering to sell a Black Rhino horn for $20,000.  In a covert capacity I secured his knowledge and agreed to meet him at a new casino in Las Vegas for the transaction. My colleague and Special Agents from Legacy U.S. Customs leased an adjacent room to the suspect and wired me up.

The horn was genuine and I agreed to purchase it for $20,000.  But only after debating the suspect’s friend who handed me a National Geographic Magazine with an article showing a single Black Rhino horn was worth $25,000 on the black market.  After paying a $1,000 deposit to hold the horn, I promised to return with the balance ($19,000 I never had). I opened the door and my colleague and U.S. Customs Agents entered to detain and fully identify the seller and his two colleagues and seize the horn and the $1,000 deposit.

 

Many weeks later after the suspect was indicted and later pled guilty, the end result was a federal judge assessing the suspect a meagerly fine plus court costs. After all that expenditure of effort, time, and money, not to mention the profit to be made. The judge just orders a fine and court costs for the life of an endangered rhino? They should be worth more alive than dead.

A colleague with another federal agency later quipped that his co-worker had several unpaid parking tickets in his government vehicle glove box that was more than the fine levied in this rhino horn case.

My colleague was shocked at the failure of justice and said it was impossible for the judge to be that stupid.

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WAN Investigator Uncovers Details Of A Presidential Wildlife Legacy

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Grizzly Bear Delisting: Scientific Misconduct Corrupts Wildlife Management

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Sam Jojola, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Special Agent (retired)

WAN:  Contrary to what Washington D.C. wildlife bureaucrats have said for the past decades, politics have and will, in many cases, trump science.   Especially when it comes to the latter part of a political administration when, miraculously, some species have an amazing “recovery” and can either be delisted, or not listed at all.

The USFWS proposed the delisting of the grizzly bear in the Yellowstone Ecosystem as of March 3rd.  The world will be watching how this decision plays out in the months ahead, and any failures will be inherited by the new presidential administration.  Perfect! Impeccable timing!

The 50 or so grizzly bears in the Cabinet-Yaak Ecosystem in Montana are not being considered by USFWS for greater protection, and will not be upgraded from a threatened to endangered status (http://flatheadbeacon.com/2016/02/15/conservationists-sues-cabinet-yaak-grizzly-bears/).  The grizzlies in this ecosystem have been plagued by hunters mistaking them for black bears, but also are threatened by malicious kills and other man inflicted causes.

USFWS bureaucrats historically over several decades have completely lost the trust of the American public in numerous decisions involving delisting and listing procedures for a variety of species of concern.  Political meddling into science- based wildlife is a long-ongoing documented pattern within USFWS upper level management.

Just Google the words “scientific misconduct by USFWS”, and one can see a continuous pattern of political selling out of wildlife resources, scientific fraud, whistleblower retaliation, and many cases of cronyism (catering to special interest groups like the wind power industry, Safari Club International, and others).

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