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Washington State University silences researcher to placate ranchers and politicians

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SOURCE:  SEATTLE TIMES

A motion-triggered wildlife camera at the den site of the Profanity Peak pack captures pack members on camera last June 30. Seven pack members were killed by Department of Fish and Wildlife after the wolves killed cattle grazing on public land at the Colville National Forest. (WSU wolf livestock research program)

A WAR OVER WOLVES

Outspoken researcher says his university and lawmakers silenced and punished him

By Lynda V. Mapes, Seattle Times environment reporter

By a slow slide of river deep in Washington’s wolf country, Robert Wielgus laughs at the tattoo on his arm of Four Claws, the grizzly that almost killed him.

“I would rather face charging grizzly bears trying to kill me than politicians and university administrators, because it is over quickly,” said Wielgus, director of the Large Carnivore Conservation Lab at Washington State University.

A Harley-riding, self-described adrenaline junkie at home in black motorcycle leathers with a Stetson and a .357 in the pickup, Wielgus, 60, is no tweed-jacket academic. For decades he has traveled North America wrangling bears, cougars and wolves to collar and study their behavior, including collaborations with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).

Wielgus now finds himself crosswise with ranchers, lawmakers and WSU administrators — and their lobbyists. He’s lost grant funding for his summer research, has been forbidden from talking to media in his professional role and has been reviewed — and cleared — for scientific misconduct.

To understand why involves a look at state policy concerning a menagerie of animals: cougars, sheep, cattle and wolves. And one more animal: homo sapiens.

In Washington, it turns out, wolves and livestock are getting along better than the people who manage and study them.

Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER), a national nonprofit specializing in government scientist whistleblower protection, in April filed a 12-page complaint against WSU officials, alleging the university punished and silenced Wielgus to placate ranchers and state legislators who objected to his research. WSU officials declined to comment for this story, citing possible litigation.

Read the rest of this story HERE.

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Nick Jans, Author of “A Wolf Called Romeo” returns to Wild Horse & Burro Radio (Wed., 1/18/2017)

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painy More

Good Wolves and Other Fables: Part 2

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strip bannernew-logo25W. R. McAfee

OPINION: Part 2

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The Southwest is the area where Canadian and Mexican wolves mostly likely will meet and crossbreed. According to USFWS documents, the Mexican wolf’s inbreeding contributes to small litter sizes and low pup-survival rates. Cross-breeding with the non-native Canadian wolves would “solve” the Mexican wolf’s gene pool problem. Call it a “nonessential experimental Mexican wolf subspecies.” Or call it what it is—a bigger crossbred “Mexican” gray wolf.

Matt Cronin, a University of Alaska, Fairbanks and research professor of animal genetics, addressed USFWS officials at their Public Hearing Concerning Mexican Wolves in Arizona on December 3, 2013. He told the panel:

“. . . Mexican wolves went through a very large bottleneck. They don’t represent the original population. They came from a small Canis population. Assessing the subspecies is somewhat futile in that respect.

“. . . subspecies, in general, are basically a subjective category. They are not a hard scientifically blank category.

“. . . this phenomenon of naming species and subspecies has been termed by the broad scientific community as inflation, splitting things into groups with the intent of granting conservation, again. The entire scientific community outside of the wildlife is recognizing this. And it’s very important that we realize that subspecies as a scientific category is subjective. It’s not definitive. The scientific community agrees on it.

“ . . . I suggest you use the entire body of science and the recent discrediting of subspecies that have been listed and reconsider the science. . .”
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Good Wolves and Other Fables: Part 1

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strip banner

new-logo25W. R. McAfee

OPINION: Part 1

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is delisting and relinquishing management of gray wolves back to state wildlife officials while simultaneously proposing “new rules”1 to “save” the Mexican gray wolf. The proposals include:

► Keeping the Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) on the endangered list as a subspecies. A conundrum. The Mexican wolf is a gray wolf that breeds with other gray wolves and is not a subspecies. A grizzly and a black bear are subspecies. A horse and donkey are subspecies that produce sterile offspring.

►Issuing permits to private landowners to kill wolves killing livestock on their property based on the number of Mexican gray wolves that exist in the wild, not immediate or continuing wolf depredations.

►Handling Mexican wolves killing livestock on private lands are not included in the USFWS’s new ‘problem’ wolf proposals. Mexican wolves killing livestock on private land are problem wolves. More

Finally, a book that tells the truth about wolves

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 OP-ED

by W.R. McAfee, Sr. (c)copyright 2010

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Want to learn the truth about wolves?  Read Will Graves’ book, Wolves In Russia : Anxiety Through the Ages. It is the most accurate book ever written about these killers; stripping away the lies and propaganda that has been deliberately fed to the American public.

One of the things that Graves discovered when he was in Russia was that packs of wolves followed Napoleon’s forces as they retreated from Moscow along four routes.  As soldiers became weak or straggled away from the columns, the wolves attacked and killed them. In fact, they got so used to eating human flesh that for years afterwards, the wolves continued to attack humans along Napoleon’s retreat routes. And they continue to menace Russian wildlife, livestock, and people to this day.

Kings Mountain National Battleground Monument in the U.S. states in their introductory video that “. . .of the bodies left unburied of the British troops, so many packs of wolves gathered upon the mountain [to eat them] that the  locals could not go up on the mountain for years afterwards.” 

Wolves are killers.  And the ESA gave them a free pass for unlimited predations on livestock, wildlife, and now humans.

In an article in Montana’s Independent Record newspaper, Dave Habel said in 2008 he and an East Helena youth were “false charged” by wolves recently while elk hunting just west of Helena in the mountains above the city’s Tenmile Water Treatment Plant. More

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