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TS Radio Network: Whistleblower’s!…Sharon N. Kramer/ Standing Against Judicial Corruption

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Join us this evening April 18, 2019 at 7:00 pm CST More

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Nearly 100,000 Pentagon Whistleblower’s Complaints Have Been Silenced

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Article of 17 April 2019 by Lee Camp on Pentagon Whistleblower Complaints

I don’t know if I’d have the nerve to be a whistleblower. I’d like to think I would. We all like to think we would, just like we all like to think we could catch the game-winning touchdown, triumph on “America’s Got Talent,” and fold a fitted sheet quickly and without cursing.

But to blow the whistle on a huge organization with a lot of power, likely drawing that power to come crashing down on your head—that takes some serious spine-age. Now, imagine the organization you’re calling out is arguably the largest, most powerful, most secretive and most violent organization on planet Earth. I’m speaking, of course, of the U.S. Department of Defense.

Yet thousands, even tens of thousands, of people have taken that step over the past five years. (More on this in a moment.)

All the while our organized human murder machine continues its work around the world. Every day. Every hour. Never a moment of rest. Never pausing to clip their toenails or scratch their ass. Bombs dropped. Buildings blown up. People killed or imprisoned. No end in sight.

By the way, that’s the term I like to use instead of “military”—Organized Human Murder Machine.

It has a nice ring to it, doesn’t it? “Mili-tary” sounds too boring, too banal. Sounds like a super-lame couple you met at a party. “Yeah, Millie and Terry over there are accountants. If I have to hear one more joke about capital gains taxes, I’m gonna kill myself.”

But that’s not what the military is. The military is a gigantic organized human murder machine, and even if you “support” every action our military has ever taken, you can still acknowledge it’s an organized human murder machine. (You would just bizarrely argue that all the murder has been just and sound and pure.)

Eleven months ago I covered $21 trillion of unaccounted-for adjustments at the Pentagon over the past 20 years. Don’t try to think about the number $21 trillion because you’ll pass out and hit your head on the desk. If your salary is $40,000 a year, in order to earn $21 trillion, it would take you 525 million years. (At which point you can’t even enjoy the new jet ski you just bought with all your money because you’re almost certainly a brain in a jar … though a nice embroidered jar that only the rich brains can afford.)

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TS Radio Network: Dialysis Advocates # 12

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TS Radio Network: Tanya TalkS ..Oklahoma Chronic Judicial Malfeasance

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Due to a family emergency this show has been cancelled until a later date.

April 14, 2019

Hosted by Tanya Hathaway

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Another Push for U.S. Law Enforcement Whistleblowers

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Coalition features two former U.S. Law Enforcement Whistleblowers
Coalition features two former U.S. Law Enforcement Whistleblowers

ATLANTAApril 8, 2019PRLog — Sixteen grassroots good government advocacy groups with a combined total of nearly 20,000 members, are proposing a new way for President Trump, his Attorney General William Barr, and Tennessee Governor Bill Lee, as well as Ohio Governor Mike DeWine to demonstrate that Blue Lives in fact matter to them.  According to the coalition’s spokesperson, Dr. Zena Crenshaw-Logal, the group is calling out “Black, Brown, and Blue Lives Matter advocates who watch U.S. law enforcement officers get crucified for exposing misconduct and corruption in their departments.”

In an April 8, 2019 letter to President Trump, Mr. Barr, and Governors Lee as well as DeWine, the sixteen NGOs under the banner of Opt IN USA, harken to assertions “that our Department of Justice (DOJ) has long turned a proverbial blind eye, even when U.S. law enforcement whistleblowers (LEWs) advise it of retaliation against them through atypical if not outright specious criminal prosecutions.”  The letter explains, “(t)his outreach is part of a multi-faceted, grassroots effort to secure exoneration of former Tennessee Deputy Sheriff Mark P. Lipton and former Ohio Deputy Sheriff Maurice Morris, respectively.  Yet it is not merely a response to their personal plights as former LEWs.”

A 2016 article chronicling Lipton’s and Morris’ plight and referenced by the coalition’s letter is titled “How To Get Away With Career Murder: The Unconstitutional Blueprint for Systematically Purging Whistleblowers from U.S. Law Enforcement“.  In light of that article, the coalition proposes that “all U.S. government agencies are obliged to suspend their deference and activate whatever oversight they have in regard to prosecutors who are at least negligent in addressing the prospect that probable cause was fabricated to precipitate retaliation through criminal prosecution of one or more LEWs (and perhaps any U.S. sworn public officer) for their work-related whistleblowing.”  According to the group, “(t)hat negligence may coincide with retaliatory selective prosecution, and if the potentially targeted sworn public officer(s) cannot access government machinery to attempt proving his, her, or their innocence as readily as government process can be used to supposedly prove the contrary, any resulting conviction is constitutionally infirm.”

Crenshaw-Logal addresses the rights of Americans to thorough government investigations in a recently published article titled “When Guys in Dark Suits Want to Ask You A Few Questions”.  Former deputy sheriffs Lipton and Morris are focal points of that article as well.  The featured coalition letter to President Trump and other U.S. officials is linked at the end of the article.

Learn More @ https://www.usa-investigation-priorities.biz/post/when-gu…

Contact
Dr. Zena Crenshaw-Logal
c/o The Rod Logal Center for Justice
***@comcast.net
(404) 590-5039

MAKE IT SAFE COALITION STATEMENT ON 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION ACT OF 1989

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April 10, 2019
The Make It Safe Coalition’s (MISC) Steering Committee commemorates the anniversary with a call to bridge the still-wide gap between the rights and the reality of implementing that landmark legislation’s free speech principles. The Act became effective on April 10, 1989. Since then the MISC, a non-partisan, trans-ideological good government coalition, has grown to 75 member organizations committed to the rights of whistleblowers.
Inexcusably, federal whistleblowers still have weaker rights than their contractor counterparts and nearly all private sector whistleblowers.  Congress unanimously enacted rights in the Whistleblower Protection Act four times –first, as part of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, second, in the WPA, third, in the 1994 amendments, and fourth, in the enactment of the Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act of 2012 (WPEA), a law that took thirteen years of advocacy in Congress until it passed. Despite this clear mandate, Congress had to restore these rights three times after hostile judicial activism functionally canceled them; a trend so far halted by the WPEA.
If paper rights have survived, however, actual protection is on life support. The commitment of administrative agencies charged with enforcement has been a roller coaster.  Currently, the U.S. Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB), responsible for federal employee administrative due process, does not have any Members, so justice is being denied by default. Furthermore, in any given year federal government whistleblowers have had only a five to ten percent chance of winning a ruling that their rights were violated.  This is a devastating reality for those brave employees who have risked so much to protect the public.

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Wyden Statement on the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Whistleblower Protection Act

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April 10, 2019

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Mr. President, thirty years ago today, the Whistleblower Protection Act was signed into law. To call it a triumph doesn’t do justice to the sheer number of years and people it took on both sides of the aisle to overcome numerous obstacles and enact federal protections for federal government employees who step forward and do what we all should do: expose wrongdoings in order to hold government officials and agencies accountable.

Congressional efforts to protect whistleblowers date back to at least 1912 with the enactment of the Lloyd-La Follette Act of 1912. This act guaranteed the right of federal employees to communicate with members of Congress without the oversight of their employer, and prohibited compensation to managers who retaliated against employees attempting to disclose whistleblower matters.

However, empowering Federal employees to speak up and speak the truth was, and continues to be, an ongoing struggle, one that has often pitted Congress against the Executive Branch. When President George H.W. Bush signed the Whistleblower Protection Act into law that April morning in 1989, it came after his predecessor President Ronald Reagan had vetoed a similar bill despite the fact that it had been unanimously adopted by both the Senate and the House.

The Whistleblower Protection Act, itself, was first introduced by Representative Pat Schroeder of Colorado as an amendment to the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 and then as a stand-alone bill in 1982. The principal purpose of the bill was to block retaliation against employees who came forward, a never-ending problem. The bill would have allowed “a person claiming to be aggrieved by a prohibited personnel practice to: (1) bring a civil action in a U.S. district court against the employee or agency involved (respondent); or (2) seek corrective action through the (Merit Systems Protection) Board.”

While that particular bill ultimately died after receiving unfavorable comments from the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the Merit Systems Protection Board, which adjudicates whistleblower complaints, its failure didn’t deter our colleagues from persevering. More

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