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Public Regulation Commission rejects a smart meter installation program by PNM

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From Staff ReportsPublished 10:37 a.m. MT April 18, 2018

Smart meter pilot program requested from PNM by the time of the next energy efficiency filing in 2020

The New Mexico Public Regulation Commission unanimously rejected the Public Service Company of New Mexico’s proposal to install Advanced Metering Infrastructure , called smart meters, citing rate increases, an excessive opt-out fee and layoffs as deal breakers.

“After several hearings, I felt the program was clearly not in the best interest of the public,” Commission Chairman Sandy Jones, who represents District 5, said. “I held public meetings in Silver City and Deming and many of my constituents agreed.”

Following three separate hearings held over the course of almost two and a half years, the commissioners concurred that the proposed AMI program did not fairly balance the interests of investors and ratepayers or promote the public interest.

According to a release from the PRC, the commissioners determined the AMI program failed to take advantage of possible energy efficiency measures, identify sufficient operational benefits, or provide meaningful opt-out opportunities. Especially significant was a concern that the lifetime costs to ratepayers would exceed savings in contrast with the benefits shareholders would reap.

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S.510 Section. 419 Enforcement: the corporate contracting enabling agricultural police actions in your state

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Marti Oakley (c) copyright 2010 All Rights Reserved

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Sect. 419. (d) Enforcement: The secretary may coordinate with the Secretary of AG, and as appropriate, shall CONTRACT and coordinate with the agency or department designated by the governor of each state to perform activities to ensure compliance with this section.

This small section clarifies the fact that the federal government cannot interfere in agriculture.  In light of this, the “secretaries” of the private corporations ie., the USDA, FDA, HHS and HSD will collude with the governors of the states to determine which state level department (corporation) will enter into a private corporate contract with these federal agencies.

Without this corporate contracting, the federal government cannot gain access to the states to implement their “business plans”, S.510 “The corporate takeover of agriculture”

S.510 cannot be forced onto the states as simply a federal law.  There is no enacting clause, or constitutional authority for the creation, passage and implementation of this law.   More

WORLD WATER DAY OF MOURNING back in 2001

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 This is just a sampling of what happens when water becomes a commodity.  Privatization has been tried in England.  Water rates rose 45% overnight, maintenence was cut to a bare minimum and the quality of water fell to all time lows. 

In Bolivia where water has been privatized, indigenous people who attempted to dig their own wells were murdered.  150 in all. 

The Clean Water Restoration Act will facilitate the privatization of US water supplies and rights. 

 Extract from SAMWU Press Statement, 20 March 2001

The South African Municipal Workers Union (SAMWU) calls for this year’s World Water Day to be declared a day of mourning for the millions of people who are sick and dying as a result of not having access to water. The United Nations chose “Water and Health” as the theme for World Water Day on Thursday 22nd March 2001. Nothing could be more ironic in South Africa and across the African continent. People here are becoming more and more unhealthy and dying prematurely because water is now a commodity that only the rich can afford.

Behind the inevitable glib and cheery public relations turning on of taps for the first time on Thursday, lies the shocking reality that worldwide, more than five million people, most of them children, die every year from illnesses caused from drinking poor quality water.

A shocking new survey has revealed that much of the blame for this must be laid at the feet of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF). Their water privatization and full cost recovery policies have been imposed as conditions for IMF loans in over 12 African countries. Negotiated under the IMF’s new Poverty Reduction and Growth Facility (PRGF), the conditions are leading to people being cut off from water more than ever before.

The Africa Policy and Information Centre has reported that water privatization is making water less accessible and less affordable. People are resorting to unsafe water sources. This is clearly evident in South Africa where the amount of cholera infections is close approaching 70 000!

In Ghana, the result of forcing the poor to pay “market rate tariffs” for water means that most Ghanains can no longer afford water at all. Only 36 percent of the rural population have access to safe water and 11 percent have adequate sanitation within the existing system. Water is also scarce in the capital, Accra. In poor areas of Accra, families are paying almost half the daily wage for 10 buckets of water!

In Angola, there is an agreement that water prices should rise regularly so that the company delivering water can make a “reasonable” profit. In Benin, Tanzania, Guinea-Bissau, Niger and Rwanda water privatization must be completed by the end of this year for governments to qualify for loans. In Sao Tome and Principe, there will be no further government subsidy of water in the run up to privatization.

This is clearly ridiculous. In some of the most poverty stricken countries in Africa, unemployed and homeless people who cannot even afford a crust of bread now and then, are expected to fork out one months food money for a few buckets of water! In the last month alone in Cape Town and Johannesburg, thousands of people have been disconnected from water they could not afford to pay for. Even permanently employed workers are being forced to choose between food, electricity or water. This terrible reality makes a mockery of human rights day.

Even in so-called first world countries like New Zealand, people are being forced to take to the streets against the commercialization of water. Water activists in Auckland will be protesting on World Water Day against the City Council. The demands of the activists are that all commercialization be stopped and water be restored to the public service after hundreds of families were disconnected from water they could no longer afford.

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