Guest Author: Angela V. Woodhull,Ph.D.

© 2010-2011, Angela V. Woodhull, Ph.D.  All rights reserved.*

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“A large part of the victim’s money is spent on attorney’s fees and guardian’s fees.  As long as there is ample money in the victim’s guardianship account, the guardian and her attorney cohorts will file motion upon motion after motion to the courts,”

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STEP ONE—“EMINENT DANGER”—THE INITIAL COURT       PETITION

The professional guardian, with the assistance of her attorneys, commences the embezzlement process by filing an emergency petition in the probate courts to become the “emergency” “temporary” guardian

Florida guardianship statutes, like many states, (Chapter 744) require that there be an “eminent danger” in order for the petitioner to become the “emergency temporary guardian.”

The guardian oftentimes fabricates the “eminent danger” by , stating that there is a neighbor or relative or stranger who is taking advantage of the elderly person.  In some cases, this may be a somewhat true statement, albeit an exaggerated claim.  In most cases, upon further investigation, there has been no “eminent danger” whatsoever.

Step One takes away all of the victim’s civil rights and therefore gives the guardian and her attorneys full control over the victim and his or her assets.

STEP TWO—THE EXAMINING COMMITTEE   More