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What a Typical Oil Pipeline Spill/Rupture in Dakota Farmland Looks Like

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By Gary G. Kohls, MD

Two views of what a typical oil pipeline “spill” on dry land looks like after crews begin digging up part of the most superficial layer of the oil-saturated, totally irremediable, contaminated wheat field soil that was in the vicinity of the pipeline rupture.

The photos above were taken soon after the 2013 underground rupture of a Tesoro pipeline near Tioga, North Dakota. Farmer Steve Jensen, who had been paid by the pipeline company in exchange for permission to bury the pipe across his farmland, discovered the massive oil contamination of his wheat field while harvesting his crops on Sept 29, 2013. Jensen had to notify the company of its pipeline failure, because Tesoro’s state-of-the-art monitoring technology failed to detect the spill.

Tesoro initially grossly underestimated the significance of the spill (as is typical of all oil companies), claiming the volume of the spill, was 750 barrels. It was soon forced to publish a new figure of 20,600 barrels (which was likely also an under-estimate).

20,600 barrels is equivalent to 865,200 gallons, making the Tesoro pipeline oil spill the largest of the many spills that have plagued North Dakota since the Bakken Formation’s massive oil reserves were opened up to oil exploitation over the last two decades. The Bakken Formation, incidentally, was named after Henry Bakken a Tioga, North Dakota-area farmer where the massive oil deposit was originally discovered in 1951.

Tesoro re-named itself Andeavor a few months ago after it completed the acquisition of an oil refinery company. (Andeavor is currently valued at $105 per share on the New York Stock Exchange). The company is based in San Antonio, Texas,

The Political Economy Research Institute identified Tesoro as the 24th-largest corporate producer of air pollution in the US, releasing roughly 3,740,000 lbs of toxic chemicals annually. Major pollutants emitted annually by the corporation include more than 400,000 lbs of sulfuric acid. The EPA also named Tesoro a responsible party for four Superfund toxic waste sites.

 

To be continued.

Alberta Canada’s experience with Keystone operations

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strip bannerDNRE-Kalamazoo-River

Note:  Every effort is being made to force the passage of the Keystone pipeline.  This bill WILL NOT give the US any form of energy independence as all crude is slated to be shipped out of the country and into the global market.  Upon completion, it will provide only 35-42 permanent jobs.  This is a steep price to pay for land devastation, water contamination, spills, leaks and the dumping of toxic waste materials in Wisconsin and Minnesota.  This pipeline will also violate private property rights.

As all of this oil is slated for shipment out of the country, it would have been more cost efficient for Keystone to run a line west through Canadian states to its west coast.  But guess what!  Canadians aren’t having it!  Thats why Keystone is trying to invade the US and cause catastrophic damage here.

By the way:  Even with the horrendous history of just the last four months involving spills, leaks, water contamination etc., listed in the article below……Keystone will NOT be liable for any spills, cleanup or damage to land and water here in the US. 

And you can thank Republican’s for this fiasco!

There’s Been HOW Many Pipeline Spills in Alberta in The Last Four Months??

DailyKos

Alberta, Canada is basically a petro state. Oil and gas production rule everything and it’s happening everywhere in the north of the province. Pipelines criss cross most of Alberta. As a result, leaks of wells, facilities and pipelines are a constant thing all over the province. More

Spill response ‘inadequate’ for tar sands crude on Great Lakes

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DNRE-Kalamazoo-RiverMichigan Department of Natural Resources, via Flickr

Oil in the Kalamazoo River on July 28, 2010, three days after an Enbridge pipeline burst, causing the worst inland oil spill in U.S. history. The spill was particularly difficult to clean up because some of the oil sank.

By: Kate Golden

Oil that sinks is hard to clean up. More

Flash Bulletin: Corexit is Killing the Gulf

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J. Speer-Williams (c)copyright 2010 All Rights Reserved

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The private, foreign International Monetary/Banking Cartel controls its puppets in Washington as it controls its oil company executives. And everything the Cartel does is anti-life, there are absolutely no exceptions; and their pretended Gulf oil clean-up is a glaring case in point.

Instead of cleaning up the unprecedented catastrophe created by the Cartel’s mega-corporations (Halliburton, Transocean, and British Petroleum), these very same companies seem to be purposely killing our Gulf of Mexico, under the pretense of cleaning it up, with a chemical dispersant by the trade name of Corexit.

This news will, of course, be meet with incredulous disbelieve by those who have yet to catch on to the fact that the private interests that own the Federal Reserve System, and all other central banks in the world, also own all major multi-national corporations.

It is something you are not supposed to know, and is politically incorrect to talk about: the International Monetary/Banking Cartel owns, or controls, from its base in the financial District of London, and other undisclosed places, all large international corporations. Wall Street and the Federal Reserve banks of the US are merely the Cartel’s American subsidiaries. More

E.coli & the Gulf Oil Spill: Lessons to be Learned

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John W. Munsell, Manager
Foundation for Accountability in Regulatory Enforcement (FARE)
Miles City, MT
“Force the Source”

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If USDA’s Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) were assigned the responsibility to investigate the current oil spill in the gulf, and provide solutions, they would be as follows:

  1. 1.     Louisiana, Mississippi, and other states are responsible for the environmental degradation because they allowed contaminants to enter their boundaries.
  2. 2.    Petroleum is a contaminant only when it arrives at the destination, namely, the coastlines.  Prior to its arrival, petroleum is a relatively harmless minor irritant.
  3. 3.    Louisiana, Mississippi and other states must implement corrective actions to prevent future recurrences.
  4. 4.    BP is not liable for this impending catastrophe, because (a) BP is producing a legal commodity, and (b) all liability for this catastrophe must be assumed by the destination states.

Any sensible person would discredit the four statements above, More

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