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In The Wild West Claim Jumper’s are Still Alive and Well

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Author,
Chuck Frank

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This story is a hard one. It began in California with an 80 year old mother who in good faith loaned money to a friend but after the papers were signed, she and her son James had been fleeced by a bait and switch move to where a good portion of their property was lost in the shuffle.

It is an elder abuse and fraud case that just won’t go away, and since the mother has passed, the son who is now 80 years old, inherited the tragedy. It reads like a novel to where ruthless and dishonest players, for a long time had been the standard in Nevada County which included administrators, a judge, County Counsel, Code enforcement and finally a band of attorneys who James Butler had been heartlessly defrauded by.  Yet for now, there is new hope and light at the end of the tunnel.

Placing this story in perspective, a sandy beach by the name of Lander’s Bar is an extension of an old mill site where James Butler has lived for a good many years.  This included 40 acres that was bought adjacent to his mining claim which is still disputed by his ex claim jumper friend, plus the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) which is looking for their own piece of the action. And where is this all leading us. It is taking us down the road to the projected 28 million dollar Lander’s Bar, gold mining claim which lies where the ancient Yuba River and Deer Creek comes together. Miraculously, Jim Butler’s property was skipped over during the gold rush and was never mined because of a gigantic flood that happened a couple of years after 1849. And still to this day, all of that gold still rests 23 or more feet down in the earth. More

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Nevada County Board of Supervisors: Wildfire Severity

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strip bannernew-logo25Kirk Pharis
Board Chair of CABPRO

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“California just passed three water management bills, bringing meters to some wells. New state “super priorities” now places habitat protection first (yellow-legged frogs), health and safety next (humans), and agriculture last in regard to water. Previously, the priorities were listed as human consumption first, then agriculture, then habitat preservation.”

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Wildfire Severity

On August 26th the Nevada County Board of Supervisors (BOS) unanimously passed a resolution “declaring an ongoing emergency due to the … threat of wildfire in Nevada County, and urging the Governor of California to take an active role at the federal level to demand that the federal government take action…” That may sound like a great idea to many, but there may be more to the picture.

On July 22nd the Sierra County BOS was the first to sign a county “Proclamation of Local Emergency” resolution. In the supporting documents provided regarding that agenda item, there was far more information than what is seen in their resolution.

Sierra County wants the governor not only to get involved, but to “seek concurrence of the President of the United States over the Sierra Nevada-wide declaration of local emergency.” Do we need – or want – an Executive Order (EO) from the President to dictate to our county what will be done in our forests? Currently there are laws in place that require the federal government to harmonize with county plans when making decisions about public land within the county. Could an EO end that? More

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