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Multi-national corporations destroying agriculture

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This is an extremely important report on the interference and support of governments around the world, on behalf of mega corporations to end anything but industrialized food production.  This article deals with the meat trade, and it does not take much to see that the eradication of our cattle ranchers is on the horizon as multi-national corporations use government to run them out of business in favor of “globalism” a euphamistic term used to replace the term “fascism”.  S.510, the fake food safety bill now in the Senate, would seal the deal for US farmers and ranchers and hand our agricultural sector over to multi-national conglomerates.  Marti

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 Live Link: Big Meat is growing in the South

GRAIN

People in the South appear to be eating a lot more meat these days. The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) says that per capita meat consumption in developing countries doubled between 1980 and 2005, while the consumption of eggs more than tripled. What happened? According to some, the main factor has been rising incomes in Asia. But the bigger factor is on the supply side. Agribusiness corporations, backed by massive subsidies and government support, have ramped up global industrial meat production to formidable levels over recent decades, with devastating consequences for people, animals and the environment. Much of this is now happening in the South, where a rising group of home-grown transnational corporations (TNCs) is joining ranks with the older firms from the North to push Big Meat into every corner of the planet.

What is fuelling the galloping market for meat in the countries of the South? The short answer is an abundance of cheap, factory-farmed meat, behind which stands an abundance of cheap feed. Today’s explosion in meat consumption in the South is really just round two of what happened years ago in the North, when companies began setting up factory farms and feedlots to convert mountains of subsidised cereals and oilseeds into animal protein for fast-food kitchens and supermarket aisles. The excess meat, from frozen chicken legs to cow entrails, was – and continues to be – dumped on poorer countries. More

USDA – New laws for meat packers

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USDA

The proposed rule is available from the Grain Inspection, Packers & Stockyards Administration (GIPSA) as www by clicking on “Federal Register.”
 Source: usda.com

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture plans to begin rulemaking next week that very well could lead to “the most aggressive” remodeling of the Packers & Stockyards Act (PSA) since it was created in 1921.

The rule will be published on June 22 and will be directed toward making sure that the marketplace is fair and transparent and rewards contract growers and livestock producers for investment, labor and producing high-quality livestock and poultry, Vilsack said during a teleconference with trade reporters.
The rule, which is required by the 2008 Farm Bill and by the PSA itself, will provide a 60-day comment period.
Much of the rule addresses the consolidation and integration of production that Vilsack implicated has damaged the vibrancy of farming and rural communities.
Vilsack emphasized that the changes proposed in the rule are designed to protect producers and would prohibit packers from engaging in practices that USDA believes are anticompetitive if not collusive, such as favoring certain-sized producers and packer-to-packer buying.
In particular, the proposed rule will require that contracts be publicly available so producers entering into contracts can determine if they’re receiving terms that are consistent across substrates such as a region or an industry itself or fundamentally different from contracts offered other parties.
Vilsack said the issues that the rule addresses are not so much about demand and supply but for whom demand and supply “is working.” He said it’s about level playing fields so those who “work hard have a shot at success.”
He also emphasized that there are “a number of great companies” in the livestock packing and poultry industry “that do the right thing,” and the rule won’t really change how they conduct business. It’s the companies that don’t “play by the rules” that will be affected, he said.

Tester introduces Meat Safety and Accountability Act

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Everyone:

Please find below a Press Release issued by Senator Jon Tester this Wednesday, announcing his introduction of the “Meat Safety and Accountability Act“, aka “The Traceback Bill“.  If it passes, USDA would be forced to trace back to the slaughterhouse of origin of enteric bacteria, namely E.coli and Salmonella.  USDA has publicly admitted that it will NOT perform Tracebacks when agency-collected samples of ground beef are determined to be contaminated with E.coli.  Instead, USDA will only do tracebacks when E.coli-laced meat causes an outbreak. More

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