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Has anyone ever refused to answer a question from a federal inquisitor on Tenth Amendment grounds

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D o w n s i z e r – D i s p a t c h

Quote of the Day: “All substances are poisons: there is none which is not a poison. The right dose differentiates a poison and a remedy.” — Paracelsus (1493-1541)

The baseball pitcher, Roger Clemens, is in the news. He has been charged with the supposed crime of lying to the politicians in Congress about his use of steroids.

* How should we think about this?
* What are the Constitutional issues involved?

To answer these questions we offer you some imaginary testimony — things Roger Clemens could have said to Congress, instead of what he did say.

* You’ve heard of people “pleading the 5th” — invoking the 5th Amendment’s protection against self incrimination, but . . .
* James Wilson argues that Clemens should have “plead the 10th” — invoking the 10th Amendment’s limitation of federal power.
* You’ll see why when you read the imaginary testimony below.

An earlier version of this was published on Thursday, January 10, 2008, when Clemens was first called to testify before Congress. This slightly edited version makes points that are just as relevant now.

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Has anyone ever refused to answer a question from a federal inquisitor on Tenth Amendment grounds? I don’t know, but I’d love to hear it from Roger Clemens when he testifies at a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee next month:

“Mr. Chairman, I have read the Constitution and it does not grant you authority to hold a hearing on steroid use. Therefore, I will exercise my rights as an American citizen under the Tenth Amendment, and my natural rights as a human being, by refusing to answer your questions.

“But let me clarify one thing: I do see under Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution that Congress has the authority to regulate commerce among the states and with foreign nations. It’s possible that this includes anything that relates to the selling of goods across state lines. I will therefore affirm that . . . More

Not NAIS: USDA issues new Animal Traceability Framework

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February 16th, 2010 | Author: Amanda

The federal animal-tracking program NAIS would have been a disaster for small-scale farmers and homesteaders; the grassroots No-NAIS movement turned it into a PR nightmare for the USDA. Last week, Ag Sec’y Tom Vilsack proposed a new, more flexible program. Read on for details.

A NAIS history lesson

Way back in the day, some people at USDA dreamed up NAIS — a National Animal Identification System. While the intention — track disease, protect farms with good practices and hold others accountable– may have been noble, NAIS was the farming equivalent of “using a hatchet where you need a scalpel” (as a certain President might put it). NAIS would have required farmers, homesteaders and even pet owners to register their animals with the government, tag them, track and report their movements (across state borders, not around the farm), and submit yearly paperwork and fees. More

“To Free America” radio program. Guests: Paul Griepentrog and Randy Cook

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American News Net

Linked here:      First Amendment Radio  

Randy Cook and Paul Griepentrog of the National Organization of Raw Materials will be guests of Randy Yarbrough on “To Free America” radio program.  They will be discussing the proposed food safety bills, and presenting a rebuttal of the FDA’s and USDA’s presumption of having authority to regulate on farm production through interstate commerce.  From 5-7 CDT Thursday  

Leges vigilantibus, non dormientibus subveniunt. The laws aid those who keep watch, not those who sleep (that is, the vigilant, not the negligent).

http://americanewsnet.com/

http://www.firstamendmentradio.com/

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