Home

Real Americans and the American Oligarchy

Leave a comment

 Contributor & author:  Marilyn M. Singleton, MD, JD, (California) board-certified anesthesiologist, professor and Association of American Physicians and Surgeons Board of Directors member (see bio at bottom of release)

  • Preview: This political and powerful class of people want to change the way we live and think—whether we like it or not. We will never have as much money to buy political influence as do the American oligarchs. But we do have our voices. Parents are speaking up about their schools’ curricula and toxic overtly racist policies that perversely segregate students by skin color and laws that bypass parental input into their children’s medical decisions. Physician office practices are changing to meet the needs of patients, not insurance and pharmaceutical companies. Physicians who have fought for open medical discussion about vaccine safety and efficacy are leaving their mark. CDC Director Walensky finally publicly admitted that the Covid vaccines do not stop transmission of the virus. Many physicians have gone from looking at their unvaccinated patients in horror to “I respect your choice.”The oligarchs do not represent the real America. It’s up to us to carry on the legacy of American heroes who thought for themselves and bucked the system. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

March 16, 2022

by Marilyn M. Singleton, M.D., J.D.

Driving across our country makes one appreciate this glorious and (dare I say) exceptional country. The diverse landscapes are a feast for the eyes. Food for the soul is the affirmation that most Americans love their families, treasure America, and enjoy their fellow Americans whether they be white, black, or somewhere in between.

Daily, the media dutifully inform us coastal and urban residents about gender fluidity, diversity training, and decarbonizing energy systems to avert the coming environmental Armageddon. When the media could not flog us with a juicy Covid-19 tragedy, they resurrect a tired but effective angst-inducing headline about the imminent big earthquake. More

Hackers Pose Significant Risk to Your Healthcare Data

Leave a comment

new-logo25Emma Bailey

__________________________________________

Last year’s Heartbleed data breach exposed one of the latest dangers of living in a digitized world. With the entire healthcare system becoming increasingly reliant upon digital organizational systems, a patient’s most private information — prescriptions, records, communications, you name it — is vulnerable to hacks. While doctor-patient confidentiality and HIPAA legislation aim to keep your information from falling into the wrong hands, the rise of the Internet of Things and improved Internet connectivity across the board allows for data to spread through new and unpredictable digital channels.

Illegally obtained medical records promise huge sums of money on the black market, more so than customer or banking information, or even risque photos of famous celebrities. Certain kinds of personal information are very valuable for those wanting to pose as someone else in order to obtain medical care. And although there are dozens of cybersecurity-related legislative proposals before Congress, and some amendments have been made to certain pre-existing legislation, there is still much work to be done to safeguard patients against future health care data scandals.

The Heartbleed “mishap” incited a wave of widespread privacy and identity-theft panic from those within the healthcare sector, as well as from other professionals who were later held culpable for the dataleaks. It has become glaringly obvious that thousands of servers are vulnerable to attacks from outside intruders, and it’s also clear that unsophisticated Secured Sockets Layer (SSL) certificates are, perhaps, not as safe as experts believed (and vastly inferior to CryptoComply modules).

The real question, then, is what can healthcare companies and individuals do to safeguard themselves against similar hacking attacks in the future? Some are confident that newly drafted legislation like FedRAMP, and amendments made to pre-existing laws, might be helpful towards that end. Ideally, the FedRAMP regulations will adequately address common security concerns, such as multi-tenancy and shared resource pooling, and provide a standard set of regulations that would ensure secure cloud usage in the Healthcare industry. More

%d bloggers like this: