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The Health Ranger Misfires the Population Bomb

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 Frank Veracity/PPJ Contributor

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Climate constantly changes, it’s called WEATHER.  Weather always affects crops, however…”

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          Bloomberg came out with a story last week revealing that George Soros is selling gold and buying farmland.  Some large farming investments reap over 16% profits yearly.  Soros makes his money by renting land to farmers and land appreciation (notice that he owns the land).

Mike Adams discusses food shortages in his article ‘Why is George Soros selling gold and buying farmland?’ http://www.naturalnews.com/033319_food_prices_farmland.html 

Adams identifies the following causes of food shortages:

1.  Increased food demand- this is a veiled reference to overpopulation.  The Malthusian overpopulation theory is incorrect and is used to justify depopulation.  By the way, the UN projects that by 2050 the world’s population will be around 9 billion people and will plateau there- the population projection for 2300 is still 9 billion people.

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=9136&Cr=population&Cr1

Here are some of Mike Adams’ thoughts on overpopulation from another article:

“When the population continues to expand and most of the world’s resources are wiped out, the human population will plunge into a time of great darkness. The loss of life will be immense — perhaps as much as a 90% reduction in the planetary population. Ecosystems will fail, crops will fail and civilization itself will be brought to its knees.” http://www.naturalnews.com/029056_environmental_protection_population_control.html#ixzz1V6uP6AP8

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The Alcohol Revolution

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Tuesday, January 4, 2011

The Alcohol Revolution

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Multi-national corporations destroying agriculture

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This is an extremely important report on the interference and support of governments around the world, on behalf of mega corporations to end anything but industrialized food production.  This article deals with the meat trade, and it does not take much to see that the eradication of our cattle ranchers is on the horizon as multi-national corporations use government to run them out of business in favor of “globalism” a euphamistic term used to replace the term “fascism”.  S.510, the fake food safety bill now in the Senate, would seal the deal for US farmers and ranchers and hand our agricultural sector over to multi-national conglomerates.  Marti

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 Live Link: Big Meat is growing in the South

GRAIN

People in the South appear to be eating a lot more meat these days. The UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) says that per capita meat consumption in developing countries doubled between 1980 and 2005, while the consumption of eggs more than tripled. What happened? According to some, the main factor has been rising incomes in Asia. But the bigger factor is on the supply side. Agribusiness corporations, backed by massive subsidies and government support, have ramped up global industrial meat production to formidable levels over recent decades, with devastating consequences for people, animals and the environment. Much of this is now happening in the South, where a rising group of home-grown transnational corporations (TNCs) is joining ranks with the older firms from the North to push Big Meat into every corner of the planet.

What is fuelling the galloping market for meat in the countries of the South? The short answer is an abundance of cheap, factory-farmed meat, behind which stands an abundance of cheap feed. Today’s explosion in meat consumption in the South is really just round two of what happened years ago in the North, when companies began setting up factory farms and feedlots to convert mountains of subsidised cereals and oilseeds into animal protein for fast-food kitchens and supermarket aisles. The excess meat, from frozen chicken legs to cow entrails, was – and continues to be – dumped on poorer countries. More

World Bank report on land grabbing: beyond the smoke and mirrors

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Live Link: New from GRAIN | 16 September 2010  READ FULL ARTICLE HERE

Last week, the World Bank finally published its much anticipated report on the global farmland grab. After years of work, several months of political negotiation and who knows how much money spent, the study was casually released on the Bank’s website — in English only. More

GM in the public eye in Asia

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  Live Link:   GRAIN

Monsanto’s plans to push genetically modified (GM) food crops in Asia ran into a wall on February 9, 2010 when India’s Environment Minister put a moratorium on the introduction of a variety of GM brinjal (eggplant) containing Monsanto’s patented Bt gene. China too has been hesitant to approve GM food crops, notably GM rice. It appears that these Asian governments, both outspoken proponents of GM agriculture, are not only feeling the heat from their people’s strong resistance to GM food crops but are also being forced to think twice about turning their seed supplies over to Monsanto and the other foreign transnational corporations (TNCs) that control the global GM seed market. What they seem to be saying is, “Yes, we want GM seeds, but we want our public institutions to be involved in their development to safeguard the national interest.” It’s a pretty hollow argument, given how “public” research is in bed with corporate interests these days and how removed GM agriculture is from the needs of Asia’s farmers. For Asia’s small farmers is there really any difference between a national GM crop and a transnational one?

A fuzzy line between public and private in China

In his report imposing a moratorium on Bt brinjal, the Indian Environment Minister referred, amongst other things, specifically to India’s lack of a “large-scale publicly funded biotechnology effort in agriculture” that can serve as a countervailing power to Monsanto, and pointed to China’s publicly funded programme in GM, which he says is far ahead of India’s. 1 The moratorium is thus in part intended to give India time to catch up with the TNCs and its neighbour, and the long-term path still points to GMOs. This was not what the local protests against Bt brinjal across India were about. They were against GM crops per se, not simply Monsanto’s version. For the protesters, a strong national biotech programme is not going to shield Indian farmers from corporate profiteering and the other pitfalls of GMOs, as China’s example shows. More

GRAIN: Land grabs threaten Anuak

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Live link: GRAIN interviews Nyikaw Ochalla

Ethiopia is one of the main targets in the current global farmland grab. The government has stated publicly that it wants to sell off three million hectares of farmland in the country to foreign investors, and around one million hectares have already been signed away. Much of the land that these investors have acquired is in the province of Gambella, a fertile area that is home to the Anuak nation. The Anuak are indigenous people who have always lived in Gambella and who practise farming, pastoralism, hunting and gathering. Nyikaw Ochalla, an Anuak living in exile in the United Kingdom, is trying to understand what this new wave of land deals will mean for the Anuak and other local communities in Ethiopia.

How will these large-scale projects affect the agriculture of the Anuak?

The Anuak are a distinct people who have always had close ties to their environment. As an indigenous population, they have been marginalised by the government for many years. They sustain themselves mainly through farming, hunting and fishing, while some Anuak are also pastoralists.

The attraction of Gambella for foreign investors is its fertile lands. But the area is fertile because the local people have nurtured and maintained its ecological systems through their agricultural practices. They may not have had access to modern education but they have a traditional means of cultivation, which includes rotation. When the rainy season comes, they move to the drier areas and when the dry season comes they go along to the river banks, making sure that they manage their environment effectively. So all of the lands in the region are used. Each community looks after its own territory, and the rivers and farmlands within it. It is a myth propagated by the government and investors to say that there is waste land or land that is not utilised in Gambella. More

The World Bank in the hot seat

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New from GRAIN | 4 May 2010

 

GRAIN
May 2010

The World Bank is marching ahead with plans to facilitate global land grabs, while refusing to release a report that confirms the negative impacts of these deals for local communities. At its annual land conference last week, where the report was supposed to be launched, the Bank tried to redirect the land grab discussion towards “win-win” solutions. But its strategy failed, given the Bank’s staunch corporate bias and the growing public rejection of its “principles” for socially responsible land grabbing.

Read this new issue of Against the grain in English here:
http://www.grain.org/articles/?id=64. The Spanish and French versions will be online shortly.

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