Lynn Swearingen (c) copyright 2010 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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“However the major issue is the announced fees for the registration of conservation varieties in Sweden. The Agricultural Department (SJV) in Sweden has proposed a fee of 3000 SEK (approx 300 Euro) for the registration of a new conservation variety and an annual fee of 2000 SEK (approx 200 Euro).”

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Two aspects of living intertwine their way into my life on a regular basis : good Art and great Farming. A feeding of the soul along with nurturing of ones body – the basis of a pretty good life.

For the first I can recommend Canadian Robert Bateman as a Master Artist of depth, breadth and originality. Be prepared to sink into his world of detail and, through further investigation, come away amazed.  Not only does he express beauty in his works, but he lives a beautiful life contributing to his community through development of programs designed to educate and protect the natural world he lives in.

For the Second I recommend the humble seed.  If the reader is not familiar with the technical definition of what a seed is, head on over to Wiki for the various -isms, -ologies or (goodness) even the -tyledons. I prefer to consider the seed a hope, a dream, a miracle. When carefully considered breeding is planned, the most glorious varieties of sustenance to gut and glory to the palate are achieved.

What instantly springs to mind combining the best of both Art and Farming are tomatoes. Specifically the Green Zebra created by Tom Wagner in the early ’80s. If one is a “foodie” of any level, the introduction of this open-pollinated cultivar cannot be discounted. Sought by home chefs and professionals alike, the Green Zebra entered into main stream culture at local markets and fine retailers such as Whole Foods. With its arrival, the populace realized that tomatoes could be more than red-globular-cardboard cut outs picked unripe, gassed and shipped to the masses at market to be sliced into rigid forms draped across insipid greens and deemed a “dinner salad”. More

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