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Wisconsin: There will be no re-hearing of Amish case

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Emanuel Miller, an Amish from Wisconsin was targeted by DATCP and prosecuted for refusing to register his property under the supposed “voluntary” Wisconsin law.  This case was not only about forcing compliance to what was passed and publicized as a voluntary law by the Wisconsin legislature, it was also about the separation of church and state.  Had DATCP been successful in abrogating Mr. Miller’s right to adhere to his religious beliefs, the precedence would have been set to be used in future cases as the weapon to strike down relgious beliefs as a legitimate defense against government encroachement. 

Thank you to Judge Jon Counsell for this decision.

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HEARING ON PREMISE REGISTRATION CASE CANCELED
Friday, May 7th, 2010 — 11:42 am
Posted by Paul Knoff, News Director

A Clark County Judge has canceled a motions hearing in a controversial court case.

Judge Jon Counsell was scheduled to hold a hearing on a motion to reconsider his ruling in the Emanuel Miller Jr. case this afternoon, but on-line records say the hearing has been canceled per his request. More

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The Lost People: Amish vs NAIS Part II

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PPJG Original Article (See attached copyright notice. All rights reserved.)

Posted September 26, 2009 6:20 pm CST

 by Paul Griepentrog                                                                 amish

 The Lost People: Part II

A way of life was put on trial in Neillsville, Wisconsin on September 23, 2oo9, in the case against Emanuel Miller Jr., having been charged under complaint for civil forfeiture because he refused to register his property under the state’s premise registration program.  The morning session was devoted to the evidentiary hearing in which the state, represented by Clark Co. district attorney Darwin Zwieg and Bonnie Walksmuth, a court appointed attorney representing Emanuel Miller, presented evidence on behalf of the parties.

The afternoon session was devoted to the trial phase and concluded around 4 o’clock, at which time Judge Jon Counsell gave instructions that upon the completion of the trial transcript, there would be thirty days to file motions, fifteen days after to file rebuttals, oral arguments would occur seven days later, and then he would make his final decision.  More

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