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Pick Your Poison: The Fracking Industry’s Wastewater Injection Well Problem

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Source:  desmogblog.com

“The closer a company injects fracking wastewater (and all the salts and pollutants that may come with it) to aquifers supplying freshwater for drinking and agriculture, the more likely those aquifers will be contaminated. In the recent University of Texas paper, researchers call out this increased likelihood in the country’s highest producing shale play, the Permian Basin in Texas and New Mexico.”

by Justin Mikulka

The first known oil well in Oklahoma happened by accident. It was 1859 and Lewis Ross was actually drilling for saltwater(brine), not oil. Brine was highly valued at the time for the salt that could be used to preserve meat. As Ross drilled deeper for brine, he hit oil. And people have been drilling for oil in Oklahoma ever since.

Lewis Ross might find today’s drilling landscape in the Sooner State somewhat ironic. The oil and gas industry, which has surging production due to horizontal drilling and fracking, is pumping out huge volumes of oil but even more brine. So much brine, in fact, that the fracking industry needs a way to dispose of the brine, or “produced water,” that comes out of oil and gas wells because it isn’t suitable for curing meats. In addition to salts, these wastewaters can contain naturally occurring radioactive elements and heavy metals.

But the industry’s preferred approaches for disposing of fracking wastewater — pumping it underground in either deep or shallow injection wells for long-term storage — both come with serious risks for nearby communities.

In Oklahoma, drillers primarily use deep injection wells for storing their wastewater from fracked shale wells, and while the state was producing the same amount of oil in 1985 as in 2015, something else has changed. The rise of the fracking industry in the central U.S. has coincided with a rise in earthquake activity.

From 1975 to 2008, Oklahoma averaged from one to three earthquakes of magnitude 3 or greater a year. But by 2014, the state averaged 1.6 of these earthquakes a dayIt now has a website that tracks them in real time.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE.

Angry Gods, Or Something Else?

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Dan Martin (c) copyright 2011 All Rights Reserved

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Begich and Manning brought to light government documents indicating that the military has weather-control technology. When HAARP is eventually built to its full power level, it could create weather effects over entire hemispheres.

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Either God is terribly angry with us, or something else is going on.

While I don’t personally subscribe to the philosophy of a vengeful God (a creator hell-bent on destroying the creation – – – give me a break!), that means there is something else going on.

HAARP?

We must be vigilant, recognizing that the coldest winter in Europe in a thousand years, the sixth worst storm in the history of the American state of New York, the rarity of killer tornadoes in late-December in Arkansas, the crumbling and sinking of Indonesia, the frequency in the eruption of volcanoes worldwide, the countless sinkholes opening up across the landscape of the planet, the regularity of high magnitude earthquakes, the widespread flooding and relentlessly snow conditions during the summer of many countries such as Australia are, perhaps, not unrelated natural phenomena. As we enter the year 2011, it seems that we are at the tip of the proverbial iceberg, as Earth changes have increased exponentially, building upon the records set during the extreme weather conditions of 2010 and seeming to eventually taking us towards something profoundly horrifying.

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General Moly’s Mt. Hope mine: let’s hope the “Eureka moment” doesn’t spell disaster

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 Debbie Coffey   Copyright 2011  All rights reserved

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“Mining at the Mt. Hope Project will involve various types of risks and hazards, including environmental hazards, industrial accidents, metallurgical and other processing problems, unusual or unexpected rock formations, structure cave-in or slides, flooding, fires and interruption due to inclement or hazardous weather conditions.” More

Is BP preparing to use the nuclear option?

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Dr. Tom Termotto
National Coordinator

Gulf Oil Spill Remediation Conference (International Citizens’ Initiative)
OilSpillSolution@comcast.net
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There has been much speculation lately about a nuclear device being planned for closing in the BP Macondo Well in the Gulf of Mexico. The consequences of exercising this option go well beyond killing the Gulf of Mexico; there would be far-reaching and profound ramifications for the oceans of the world. There are many risks associated with this option that must be considered. Let’s review some of these before BP finishes the relief wells, which are allegedly being utilized for the strategic placement and detonation of a nuclear device. More

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