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Adoption From Foster Care – Is it More About the Money Than the

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by Terri LaPoint

By Terri LaPoint
September 6, 2019

The numbers do not add up. There are more children adopted out of foster care to non-family members than there are “substantiated” allegations of abuse or neglect against the parents. The data calls into question the entire rationale that has been given for funding adoptions from foster care.

The Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 (ASFA), promoted by the Clintons and passed by Congress, was publicized as an important means of “keeping those poor, abused, neglected foster children from languishing in foster care, helping them to find their Forever Families.

At the time when ASFA was enacted, The Washington Post touted the bill as:

the most significant change in federal child-protection policy in almost two decades.

The rhetoric sounded good, and it resonated with millions of Americans, and with lawmakers. The problem is – that is not what is happening.

Instead, hundreds of thousands of children are being taken from families whose biggest crime may be that they are poor, or that they asked for a second medical opinion for their child.

ASFA Adoption Bonuses – Only Apply to Stranger Adoptions

The Adoption and Safe Families Act provides large amounts of federal dollars to states and Child Protective Service (CPS) agencies, to the tune of billions of dollars per year, to financially incentivize the adoption of children from foster care.

From the Adoption and Safe Families Act bill text.    READ MORE>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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WATCH: Your Child ‘Belongs to the State’: Lawmakers Claim the State Owns Your Children

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The Daily Sheeple

Legislators in Texas have been working toward passing a host of laws to reform the state’s Child Protective Services agency. New legislation has been crafted to improve the agency which has seen multiple dilemmas resulting in detrimental safety problems for children in the state. There have been several bills introduced this year aimed at improving the agency. One bill, in particular, House Bill 39, seeks in part to require medical exams to be performed more quickly on children who have been newly placed into the foster care system.

HB 39, introduced by Rep. Gene Wu (D-Houston), would mandate that the state’s Department of Family Protective Services schedule a medical examination for children who have been in temporary state custody for longer than three business days. Children in rural locations would be required to receive a medical exam within seven business days.

While the bill was originally centered around hastening medical exams for new foster children, questions arose regarding whether vaccines would be included as part of these medical exams. Rep. Bill Zedler (R-Arlington), the vice chairman of the Texas Freedom Caucus, introduced an amendment to HB 39 to make vaccinations exempt from the required medical treatments. The bill saw a turbulent debate upon Zedler’s amendment as the discussion turned to childhood vaccines and who should be responsible for crucial medical decisions when custody is obscured.

“You get that child back five, eight, 10 days later, and they’ve now had that surgery or they’ve had these vaccinations,” Zedler said according to Dallas Morning News. “That’s an issue of liberty.” More

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