For Immediate Release: September 28, 2018

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — In a victory for common sense and moderation in how police carry out security protocols, a general district court has granted The Rutherford Institute’s request to dismiss the government’s case against a disabled war veteran who was arrested and charged with a crime after he lawfully purchased cans of Arizona iced tea, aerosol bug spray, a light bulb, and razor blades, all of which were on the City of Charlottesville’s list of temporarily prohibited, potentially “dangerous” items.

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John Miska, a disabled war veteran, was charged with violating a City ordinance prohibiting potentially “dangerous” items. Incidentally, the veteran’s guns (not among the list of prohibited items) caused no alarm. In throwing out the charges against Miska, the court ruled that the provision of the ordinance used to justify Miska’s arrest is overbroad and unreasonable and, therefore, unenforceable.

Elliott M. Harding of Harding Counsel PLLC, assisted The Rutherford Institute with Miska’s case.

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