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Confessions of a Medical Heretic (Part 3)

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Duty to Warn

new-logo25kohlsBy Gary G. Kohls, MD

“Still psychiatrists went on behaving as if antipsychotics were essentially benign and arguing that they were necessary to prevent an underlying toxic brain disease (7). Andreasen’s 2011 paper was widely publicized however, and it started to be acknowledged that antipsychotics can cause brain shrinkage. Almost as soon as the cat was out of the bag, however, attention was diverted back to the idea that the real problem is the mental condition.”

Part (1)

Part (2)

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Antipsychotic Drugs and Brain Shrinkage

Over the 40 years that I practiced medicine, I slowly became aware of the fact that drugs that cross the blood-brain barrier and thus impact the brain, especially those marketed for so-called mental illnesses (of unknown etiology), only mask symptoms and never cure anything – despite what the attractive, trinket-bearing salespersons from Big Pharma proclaimed as they were trying to convince me to prescribe their latest over-priced drugs (while at the same time abandoning the tried and true cheaper generics I had been using successfully for years).

When I went to medical school, we were taught that the relatively few psychiatric drugs available in the decade of the 1960s were too dangerous for us lowly family practitioners to prescribe safely. However, sometime between then and the generation of the 1980s, Big Pharma started flexing its Big Business muscles, started having previously restricted drugs available over-the-counter, started ignoring the psychiatrists (who coveted the monopoly they had had on psych meds), and started marketing heavily those same dangerous drugs so that we lowly family practitioners would help them increase their “market share”.

Living in a rural area where there were no psychiatrists to make wholesale diagnoses of mental illnesses (of “unknown etiology”) that supposedly warranted life-long drugging, I wasn’t asked by very many of my patients for psych drug treatment. But then came along Prozac.

The one time that I was asked by a patient to prescribe Prozac for her (a so-called selective [a lie] serotonin reuptake inhibitor [SSRI]), I was totally unaware that I had been deceived by Eli Lilly’s commercials and its drug reps when I was told how Prozac was supposed to work. They also skipped over (or were ignorant of) what were the serious potential dangers of the drug, especially the long-term dangers which included suicide, homicide, addiction, brain damage, sleep disorders, mania, psychosis, dementia, permanent sexual dysfunction, etc, etc. That patient didn’t take her Prozac for more than two weeks before it pooped out. But it got me curious about what synthetic, fluorinated, amphetamine-based chemicals like the SSRIs can do to the brain. More

Involuntary Neuroleptic (Antipsychotic) Psychiatric Drugs May Result in Brain Damage

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new-logo25Submitted by: Dr. Gary Kohls, MD

Preventive Psychiatry E-Newsletter # 446

Article by David W. Oaks (2oo7)

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“Today, there are many studies showing that long-term high-dosage neuroleptics can actually result in such severe structural brain changes, that these changes can include shrinkage of the parts of our brain associated with high-level cognition. “_______________________________________________

Any serious debate in 2007 ( and still being argued in 2014) about the topic of involuntary psychiatric procedures ought to include the following fact:

drugs_deesFor years, many studies have indicated that long-term high-dosage neuroleptic (also known as antipsychotic) psychiatric drugging may induce structural brain damage. This damage can include actual shrinkage of areas of the brain associated with higher-level functions, what makes us human.

In his commentary, “England’s New Mental Health Act Represents Law Catching Up with Science,” Anthony Maden demands that “ethical advocates of a change to capacity-based legislation are under an obligation to deal with the science.”

However, I note that proponents of involuntary psychiatric procedures seldom explain clearly to colleagues, the public, patients or their families, the full implications of these procedures. It is undeniable that involuntary psychiatric procedures often involve psychiatric drugging, and that neuroleptic psychiatric drugs are often used in such circumstances. More