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Potential Harms and Risks of Mask Wearing Part 3

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The WHO also lists a number of potential harms and risks of mask wearing, which “should be carefully taken into account when adopting this approach of targeted continuous medical mask use.” These include:14

  • Self-contamination due to the manipulation of the mask by contaminated hands or not changing the mask when wet, soiled or damaged
  • General discomfort, as well as facial skin lesions, irritant dermatitis or worsening acne
  • False sense of security that may reduce adherence to other well recognized preventive measures such as hand hygiene
  • Disadvantages for or difficulty wearing them by specific vulnerable populations such as those with mental health disorders, developmental disabilities, the deaf and hard of hearing community, and children
  • Difficulty wearing them in hot and humid environments

Aside from these, several people have demonstrated that masks can rapidly result in the buildup of toxic carbon dioxide, which can have a markedly detrimental impact on health.

In one video, a science teacher tried to evade YouTube censorship by saying children should wear face masks to school — all while holding up handwritten signs informing viewers the tactic was for censorship evasion, and to pay attention to the carbon dioxide metering results, which show carbon dioxide levels behind the mask shoot up above 10,000 parts per million (ppm) after just 10 breaths.

After garnering several hundred thousand views, the video was removed for “violating YouTube community guidelines.”

Del Bigtree of The Highwire has performed an identical demonstration15 (see bitchute video below). With an N95 mask on, the carbon dioxide level spikes above 8,480 ppm within seconds. Above 5,000 ppm, OSHA warns that “toxicity or oxygen deprivation could occur.”https://www.bitchute.com/embed/ypLjmXQoLygi/

Carbon dioxide levels between 2,000 ppm and 5,000 ppm are associated with headaches, sleepiness, poor concentration, loss of attention, increased heart rate and slight nausea. The maximum permissible daily exposure limit is 5,000 ppm.

Wearing a standard surgical mask, carbon dioxide levels again reached above 8,000 ppm, although it took longer. Shockingly, wearing a cloth bandana resulted in carbon dioxide buildup near the nose and mouth exceeding 8,000 ppm.

Even wearing a clear plastic face shield (without a mask) resulted in carbon dioxide levels in the 1,500-ppm range, which is associated with drowsiness and poor air quality. The video at the top of this section also addresses many of the potential harms and risks of masks wearing.

Toxic ingredients that can worsen breathing problems are yet another potential hazard of certain masks. For example, surgical masks are made of plastics like polypropylene, a known asthma trigger.16

The 2018 study,17,18 “Hypoxia Downregulates Protein S Expression,” also describes how hypoxia (low oxygen concentration) increases your risk of blood clots by reducing protein S, which is a natural anticoagulant. Wearing a mask, especially for long periods of time, may reduce your oxygen concentration, and considering COVID-19 is already associated with abnormal blood clotting, inducing hypoxia may be ill advised.

PPE Waste Is Becoming an Environmental Hazard

Last but not least, environmentalists are now warning that personal protective equipment (PPE) such as medical face masks may turn into a devastating environmental problem. As reported by The Guardian, June 8, 2020:19

“The French non-profit Opération Mer Propre, whose activities include regularly picking up litter along the Côte d’Azur, began sounding the alarm late last month.

Divers had found what Joffrey Peltier of the organization described as ‘COVID waste’ — dozens of gloves, masks and bottles of hand sanitizer beneath the waves of the Mediterranean, mixed in with the usual litter of disposable cups and aluminum cans … ‘It’s the promise of pollution to come if nothing is done,’ said Peltier.

In France alone, authorities have ordered two billion disposable masks, said Laurent Lombard of Opération Mer Propre. ‘Knowing that … soon we’ll run the risk of having more masks than jellyfish in the Mediterranean,’ he wrote on social media alongside video of a dive showing algae-entangled masks and soiled gloves in the sea near Antibes.

Having surgery? Try to keep a jaundiced eye on your care-givers if you’re conscious

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new-logo25W.R. McAfee, Sr.

Copyright  © 2013 by W. R. McAfee, Sr.  All rights reserved

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Let me say at the onset that doctors have saved my foot and my life in the past.  They’ve also damned near killed me.

The earliest bo-bo (pronounced bow-bow) I remember was jumping off a kitchen counter after my buddy and I had climbed up on it to get a cookie out of the cupboard. A half-pound coffee can with no rim set on the floor as a water dish for their cat. My heel came down in the middle of that can, and the can embedded itself in the ankle bone on both sides of my foot.

It’s hard to run with a coffee can stuck to the bottom of your foot. But not to scream.

I awoke  momentarily with my head in a lady’s lap in a pool of blood while another lady wrapped towels around my foot; remember the ether at the hospital and that’s all until I woke up in a hospital bed the next day with my foot in a cast.

I had to learn to walk again when they finally took the cast off.

A young doctor just out of med school was on duty when they brought me in.  He worked more than six hours tying nerves and whatever else had been sliced in my foot back together. Nurses brought him fresh supplies and water and kept the sweat out of his eyes.

He saved my foot and the use of it.

My family thanked him.  Profusely. More

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