Home

Scientists Under Attack/ documentary

1 Comment

ORDER HERE!

When scientist Arpad Pusztai reported that genetically modified (GM) foods caused serious health problems in rats, he was a hero at his prestigious UK institute — for two days. But after two phone calls (apparently) from the Prime Minister’s office, he was fired, gagged, and mercilessly attacked. When UC Berkely professor Ignacio Chapela discovered GM corn contamination in Mexico, he too faced a firestorm of distortion and denial that left him struggling to salvage his career. Find out how the biotech industry “engineers” the truth and what they are trying to hide from you. By Bertram Verhaag, with bonus film: Monster Salmon.

 

http://www.seedsofdeception.com/utility/showProduct/index.cfm?objectID=316

“Why do we continue to throw precaution to the wind?” Dennis Kucinich

Leave a comment

 
“Today the Supreme Court ruled that when it comes to genetically modified organisms, we as consumers have to wait until the damage is done and obvious before we can act to protect health and the environment, even if that damage could be irreversible.”

“Haven’t we learned from the catastrophe in the Gulf of the dangers of technological arrogance, of proceeding ahead with technologies without worrying about the consequences? Why do we continue to throw precaution to the wind?

“Tomorrow I will introduce three bills that will provide a comprehensive regulatory framework for all Genetically Engineered (GE) plants, animals, bacteria, and other organisms. To ensure we can maximize benefits and minimize hazards, Congress must provide a comprehensive regulatory framework for all GE products. Structured as a common-sense precaution to ensure GE foods do no harm, these bills will ensure that consumers are protected, food safety measures are strengthened, farmers’ rights are better protected and biotech companies are responsible for their products.”

– Congressman Dennis Kucinich (D-OH), on June 21, 2010, after the Supreme Court voted 7-1 to allow the experimental planting of genetically modified alfalfa seed before an environmental review is completed.

GM in the public eye in Asia

Leave a comment

  Live Link:   GRAIN

Monsanto’s plans to push genetically modified (GM) food crops in Asia ran into a wall on February 9, 2010 when India’s Environment Minister put a moratorium on the introduction of a variety of GM brinjal (eggplant) containing Monsanto’s patented Bt gene. China too has been hesitant to approve GM food crops, notably GM rice. It appears that these Asian governments, both outspoken proponents of GM agriculture, are not only feeling the heat from their people’s strong resistance to GM food crops but are also being forced to think twice about turning their seed supplies over to Monsanto and the other foreign transnational corporations (TNCs) that control the global GM seed market. What they seem to be saying is, “Yes, we want GM seeds, but we want our public institutions to be involved in their development to safeguard the national interest.” It’s a pretty hollow argument, given how “public” research is in bed with corporate interests these days and how removed GM agriculture is from the needs of Asia’s farmers. For Asia’s small farmers is there really any difference between a national GM crop and a transnational one?

A fuzzy line between public and private in China

In his report imposing a moratorium on Bt brinjal, the Indian Environment Minister referred, amongst other things, specifically to India’s lack of a “large-scale publicly funded biotechnology effort in agriculture” that can serve as a countervailing power to Monsanto, and pointed to China’s publicly funded programme in GM, which he says is far ahead of India’s. 1 The moratorium is thus in part intended to give India time to catch up with the TNCs and its neighbour, and the long-term path still points to GMOs. This was not what the local protests against Bt brinjal across India were about. They were against GM crops per se, not simply Monsanto’s version. For the protesters, a strong national biotech programme is not going to shield Indian farmers from corporate profiteering and the other pitfalls of GMOs, as China’s example shows. More

Law would protect farmers by ensuring export markets are considered before GMO approval

Leave a comment

From: Sandra Finely/Canadian Correspondent

Canadians, who seem to do more than complain, just won the first round of the battle to stop the spread of GMO crops!  Go Canada!

Alex Atamanenko, MP
BC Southern Interior-NDP Agriculture critic     APRIL 15, 2010

HISTORIC NDP GMO Bill PASSES CRUCIAL VOTE 

OTTAWA – A private members bill to protect farmers by calling for an analysis of potential harm to export markets prior to approving new genetically engineered seeds has passed second reading in the House of Commons.  Bill C-474, proposed by New Democrat Agriculture Critic Alex Atamanenko (BC-Southern Interior), will move to committee for further study.

“Despite intense lobbying efforts by the biotech industry and the Conservative government to nip this bill in the bud, the opposition parties voted instead to protect the economic interests of farmers,” said Atamanenko. “I couldn’t be happier that Parliament has made this historic decision.”

This is the first time a bill to change the rules on GMOs has passed second reading in the House.

Atamanenko believes that the government‘s science-only approach to how GMO’s are regulated is irresponsible because it completely ignores market considerations.

“It was the government’s lax regulatory process that allowed GE Triffid flax to shut out Canadian flax exports from its key markets and hurt farmers,” explained Atamanenko. “For the first time, Parliament has a chance to seriously consider a regulatory mechanism that will ensure farmers are never again faced with rejection in our export markets because we allow the introduction of GE technologies that they have not approved.”

 

Supermarkets’ Bloody Vaccination Campaign Advances Health Care Reform by Lethal Injections

5 Comments

 Healthy World Distributing

NEWS  RELEASE            ;                                            Release: No. 201-H1N1-21
Date Mailed: Sept. 26, 2009
For Immediate Release
Contact: Rob Potter 949-444-8837; RobPotter57@gmail.com

Supermarkets’ Bloody Vaccination Campaign Advances Health Care Reform by Lethal Injections 

By Dr. Leonard Horowitz and Sherri Kane

Wondering why food stores and pharmacies have replaced doctors offices and clinics as vaccinationstations? Ask Steve Burd, the wizard behind Obama’s Health Care Reform plan. 

Burd, the Chairman of Safeway Supermarkets (VONS, Pavilions, and more) is also the founder of the Coalition to Advance Healthcare Reform (CAHR) in the US., and Burd has his fingers in more pies than healthcare. His partners genocidal operations are evidenced in shocking documents delivered by these authors to the FBI last week proving Safeway’s vaccinations and health care promotions are dangerously impure and unsafe.   More

HR 2749 and shades of Hitler

Leave a comment

by the Writers Collective and Friends of Farmers

drugs_dees

Cherry growers face ten years in prison and/or $7.5 million in penalties for citing scientific studies.

Why?

Because cherries beat the pants off non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for controlling pain and lowering inflammation.  There would go billions in selling aspirin, tylenol, aleve, and the other NSAIDs, that coincidentally kill well over 16,500 people a year.  

The pharmaceutical companies (along with Monsanto and biotech and agribusiness) are behind HR 2749.  

Cherries, incidentally, don’t kill anyone.

Ending free speech around nutrition occurred during the WWII as well, when Hitler made any passing of nutritional information punishable by death.  Interestingly, some of the very same German pharmaceutical companies that backed Hitler (and produced gas for the gas chambers and killed prisoners with vaccines) and may have benefited from his “punishable by death” ruling against nutritional information, are involved in these bills.  Those companies – Bayer, BASF and Hoescht (Aventis) designed Codex which is hidden inside HR 2749 (there is a lot hidden in that bill) – a massive plan to declare all nutrients toxins and remove them from access, as well as to mandate pesticides (even banned ones), irradiation of all food, GMO approval, and make passing nutritional information, even to friends and family, a crime.  

Meanwhile, in protecting NSAIDs and keeping people from knowledge of cherries, the FDA protects the drug companies so they can keep making money, while routinely killing thousands a year. More

USDA Poised to Approve Widespread, Risky Field Trial of GE Trees

Leave a comment

http://truefoodnow.org/

On Wed, 7/1/09, Center for Food Safety

office@centerforfoodsafety.org

The biotechnology firm ArborGen has asked the USDA for permission to conduct 29 field trials of genetically engineered “cold tolerant” eucalyptus trees in the U.S. For the first time in history, this massive experiment, which is on the verge of being green-lighted, will literally be using nature as the laboratory to test more than 260,000 genetically engineered trees. Scientists across the U.S. are voicing concerns over this proposal.

As it did with GE alfalfa, USDA failed to conduct and prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to comprehensively address all the relevant issues related to the proposed eucalyptus field trials. Scientists at Duke University in North Carolina have created pollen models that show tree pollen traveling from a forest in North Carolina for over 1,000 kilometers northward into eastern Canada. A study published in the New Physiologist found pine pollen 600 kilometers from the nearest pines. Scientists researching sterility in trees have admitted that 100 percent guaranteed sterility in GE trees is impossible. This evidence implies that if GE trees are released into the environment, widespread and irreversible contamination of native forests cannot be prevented.

Contamination of natural trees by GE eucalyptus could pose a severe environmental threat. Eucalyptus grow well in warm climates, so engineering them to tolerate cold temperatures removes the only barrier to their unrestricted spread. In some places where eucalyptus have been introduced, they are well known for escaping and colonizing native ecosystems. For example, eucalyptus is listed as an invasive species and a costly plant pest in California. The spread of these plants into the wild through seeds and plant matter is highly likely, and the impacts on native ecosystems from this invader are largely unknown. Additionally, one of the experimental GE tree varieties is a known host for cryptococcus gatti, a fatal fungal pathogen whose spores cause meningitis in people and animals. More

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: