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The 9/11 Commission Rejects own Report as Based on Government…

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From :          Beat The Chip   beatthechip@gmail.com

In 2006, The Washington Post reported…”Suspicion of wrongdoing ran so deep that the 10-member commission, in a secret meeting at the end of its tenure in summer 2004, debated referring the matter to the Justice Department for criminal investigation, according to several commission sources. Staff members and some commissioners thought that e-mails and other evidence provided enough probable cause to believe that military and aviation officials violated the law by making false statements to Congress and to the commission…”

Gordon Duff Salem-News.com

(CINCINNATI, Ohio) – In John Farmer’s book: “The Ground Truth: The Story Behind America’s Defense on 9/11″, the author builds the inescapably convincing case that the official version… is almost entirely untrue…

The 9/11 Commission now tells us that the official version of 9/11 was based on false testimony and documents and is almost entirely untrue. The details of this massive cover-up are carefully outlined in a book by John Farmer, who was the Senior Counsel for the 9/11 Commission.

Farmer, Dean of Rutger Universities’ School of Law and former Attorney General of New Jersey, was responsible for drafting the original flawed 9/11 report.

Does Farmer have cooperation and agreement from other members of the Commission? Yes. Did they say Bush ordered 9/11? No. Do they say that the 9/11 Commission was lied to by the FBI, CIA, Whitehouse and NORAD? Yes. Is there full documentary proof of this? Yes. More

Obama disappoints

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Posted By Beat The Chip to Beat The Chip at 8/30/2009 05:01:00 PM     i-see-stupid-people
 
BTC Editorial
Obama disappoints. He disappoints because he’s been assimilated into the machine of Bush’s predecessors. He disappoints because he behaves as Bush did. Make no mistake – there is simply no possible way for a President to pristinely carry the adulation of the American public at all times. Which means that leaders have to have a fallback plan after the Honeymoon is over. However, so many elected him on the auspices that we wouldn’t get the Bush treatment.
 
Obama still has a chance to come correct. He can change direction any time he chooses. The issue for actors on the world stage is always MOTIVATION. Where does the context for these decisions come from? More

‘Beat The Chip’ ANSWERS:9-11 Commission Deadlines National Identity

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atm_deesBeat The Chip

 9-11 Commission Deadlines National Identity

BTC –  Amid other nagging questions, has been:  who sets Real ID compliance deadlines and what is their agenda, hidden or not?  What drives these guys to say we must have EDL technologies in every American identity by December 31,2009.  

 Unfortunately, we have an answer. 

Among them, it is yet again, pride of authorship in the 9-11 Commission Report.   Apparently our “kicking the can down the road” editorial got underneath someone’s skin. They now feel sufficiently challenged to insist in the first bullet point : In 2009 drivers licenses are STILL as lethal as terrorist weaponry. 

Nah.  They want you to buy the machine readable zone technologies.  They need to retire.  It gooses the stock. An educated guess, is that Senator Akaka doesn’t trust the pork brands they are dishing up on the backs of the American people. State governments are not that dumb. They know what works and what doesn’t.

We are a bit too smart to accept the jump they want us to make between national identity and terrorism.  It’s only a little smaller than the jump from the 9-11 attacks to the invasion of Iraq, and only slightly less conspicuous.  DHS needs a new 9-11 evaluation crew.  Longtime friend, Shane Geiger, 9-11 Truth and Architects, sent us the following report.  More

What is the PASS Act?

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This article is an orginal piece of work from the Beat the Chip site which we are linked to.  This article has been picked up and reworked by other less reliable sites and presented as their own.  If you use this article in a reprint, please credit Beat the Chip for their hard work.     http://beatthechip.blogspot.com/

 Marti

BTC Exclusive

Posted By Beat The Chip to Beat The Chip at 6/16/2009 11:09:00 AM

The PASS Act filed Monday is posing as part of the repeal effort of the expiring Real ID Act. The succession of this legislation comes on the heels of DHS exchange, giving similar legislation a second genesis.  

The Real ID will be repealed in its entirety, but only upon the condition it is replaced with a similar legislation, such as the PASS Act.


The Center for Democracy and Technology cited a a few of the comparisons and improvements. The more important question is how does passing another law, repeal the Real ID Act? According to the CDT, the Real ID Act is expected to “fade away” while the PASS Act takes its place. 

 THOSE IN FAVOR
The National Conference of State Legislatures and the National Governors Association, mid-level players between the federal mandate and the masses, have commended the legislative the PASS Act as suitable substitute. More

FCC claims the right to enter your home…without a warrant

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 hearyou

c/o Wired Magazine’s THREAT LEVEL

You may not know it, but if you have a wireless router, a cordless phone, remote car-door opener, baby monitor or cellphone in your house, the FCC claims the right to enter your home without a warrant at any time of the day or night in order to inspect it.

That’s the upshot of the rules the agency has followed for years to monitor licensed television and radio stations, and to crack down on pirate radio broadcasters. And the commission maintains the same policy applies to any licensed or unlicensed radio-frequency device.

“Anything using RF energy — we have the right to inspect it to make sure it is not causing interference,” says FCC spokesman David Fiske. That includes devices like Wi-Fi routers that use unlicensed spectrum, Fiske says.

The FCC claims it derives its warrantless search power from the Communications Act of 1934, though the constitutionality of the claim has gone untested in the courts. That’s largely because the FCC had little to do with average citizens for most of the last 75 years, when home transmitters were largely reserved to ham-radio operators and CB-radio aficionados. But in 2009, nearly every household in the United States has multiple devices that use radio waves and fall under the FCC’s purview, making the commission’s claimed authority ripe for a court challenge.

“It is a major stretch beyond case law to assert that authority with respect to a private home, which is at the heart of the Fourth Amendment’s protection against unreasonable search and seizure,” says Electronic Frontier Foundation lawyer Lee Tien. “When it is a private home and when you are talking about an over-powered Wi-Fi antenna — the idea they could just go in is honestly quite bizarre.”

 

George Washington University professor Orin Kerr, a constitutional law expert, also questions the legalilty of the policy.

“The Supreme Court has said that the government can’t make warrantless entries into homes for administrative inspections,” Kerr said via e-mail, refering to a 1967 Supreme Court ruling that housing inspectors needed warrants to force their way into private residences. The FCC’s online FAQ doesn’t explain how the agency gets around that ruling, Kerr adds.

The rules came to attention this month when an FCC agent investigating a pirate radio station in Boulder, Colorado, left a copy of a 2005 FCC inspection policy on the door of a residence hosting the unlicensed 100-watt transmitter. “Whether you operate an amateur station or any other radio device, your authorization from the Commission comes with the obligation to allow inspection,” the statement says.

The notice spooked those running “Boulder Free Radio,” who thought it was just tough talk intended to scare them into shutting down, according to one of the station’s leaders, who spoke to Wired.com on condition of anonymity. “This is an intimidation thing,” he said. “Most people aren’t that dedicated to the cause. I’m not going to let them into my house.”

But refusing the FCC admittance can carry a harsh financial penalty. In a 2007 case, a Corpus Christi, Texas, man got a visit from the FCC’s direction-finders after rebroadcasting an AM radio station through a CB radio in his home. An FCC agent tracked the signal to his house and asked to see the equipment; Donald Winton refused to let him in, but did turn off the radio. Winton was later fined $7,000 for refusing entry to the officer. The fine was reduced to $225 after he proved he had little income.

Administrative search powers are not rare, at least as directed against businesses — fire-safety, food and workplace-safety regulators generally don’t need warrants to enter a business. And despite the broad power, the FCC agents aren’t cops, says Fiske. “The only right they have is to inspect the equipment,” Fiske says. “If they want to seize, they have to work with the U.S. Attorney’s office.”

But if inspectors should notice evidence of unrelated criminal behavior — say, a marijuana plant or stolen property — a Supreme Court decision suggests the search can be used against the resident. In the 1987 case New York v. Burger, two police officers performed a warrantless, administrative search of one Joseph Burger’s automobile junkyard. When he couldn’t produce the proper paperwork, the officers searched the grounds and found stolen vehicles, which they used to prosecute him. The Supreme Court held the search to be legal.

In the meantime, pirate radio stations are adapting to the FCC’s warrantless search power by dividing up a station’s operations. For instance, Boulder Free Radio consists of an online radio station operated by DJs from a remote studio. Miles away, a small computer streams the online station and feeds it to the transmitter. Once the FCC comes and leaves a notice on the door, the transmitter is moved to another location before the agent returns.

Posted By Beat The Chip to Beat The Chip at 5/24/2009 09:29:00 PM

Minnesota rejects REAL ID

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May 18, 2009
1:14 PM

Minnesota Rejects Real ID Act Of 2005
23 States Push Back Against Unfunded Mandate To Create National ID

WASHINGTON – May 18 -� Minnesota Governor Timothy Pawlenty signed legislation on Saturday that prohibits his administration from turning the state driver’s license into a national identity card and from imposing new burdens on taxpayers, citizens, immigrants and state government. The state legislature overwhelmingly endorsed the bill with a unanimous House vote and a 64-1 vote in the Senate. Minnesota becomes the 23rd state to reject the Real ID Act of 2005, raising the question of why Congress has not repealed the law.

“23 states have now sent a clear message to Washington that they will not submit to wrongheaded federal mandates that waste state tax dollars and put privacy at risk,” said Christopher Calabrese, Counsel of the ACLU Technology & Liberty Program. “Congress should take notice and repeal the Real ID Act so that effective driver’s license security policy can be developed.”

As part of creating a national identification card, the Real ID Act of 2005 also mandates that states hold all Americans’ private information in a single database that is accessible to federal and state officials – the cost and security of which is unknown. Consequently, the National Governors Association and the National Conference of State Legislatures have expressed strong opposition to the Real ID Act.

Since its enactment – as evident by the rejection of 23 states — Real ID has faced significant resistance on the state level. During her January confirmation hearing, Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Janet Napolitano called for a review of Real ID, saying the states were not consulted enough in its creation and that the initiative is a fiscal burden on the states. Before heading up DHS, Napolitano was Governor of Arizona, where she enacted legislation prohibiting her state from complying with the requirements of Real ID.

Because Real IDs require significantly more background information than a driver’s license, privacy experts fear that the government will now have access to an unprecedented amount of highly sensitive information about citizens and that there will be an exponential rise in identity theft from the database where the information is stored.

http://www.commondreams.org/newswire/2009/05/18-4

Keep Calling your Legislators folks and remember to keep calling the Governor of Missouri.� We can win this battle in NC, TX, and PA if we keep up the good fight.


Posted By Beat The Chip to Beat The Chip at 5/18/2009 01:26:00 PM

New cybersecurity bill for electric grid readied

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From ComputerWorld

New cybersecurity bill for electric grid readied

Legislation follows report that said cyberspies gained access to U.S. electrical infrastructure

Jaikumar Vijayan

April 28, 2009 (Computerworld) Amid growing concern over the vulnerability of the U.S. electric grid to cyberattacks, two lawmakers are preparing to introduce new legislation aimed at bolstering the industry’s responsiveness to such threats.

The Critical Electric Infrastructure Protection Act is scheduled to be introduced on Thursday by Sen. Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.), chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, and Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Homeland Security.

A brief statement issued by the house committee today described the proposed legislation as one that would primarily empower the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, an independent agency that regulates the interstate transmission of gas, oil and electricity, to issue “emergency rules or orders” if a cyberthreat is imminent.

The rules or orders may be issued if the Secretary of Homeland Security determines that a national security threat exists, the statement said. It did not, however, clarify what kind of rules and orders the proposed bill is specifically referring to.

In addition, the bill would require the commission to assess existing cybersecurity standards within the electric sector and establish new standards, as needed, for dealing with cyberthreats. It would also require the Department of Homeland Security to conduct an investigation to determine if the electric infrastructure has been compromised by outsiders.

The proposed legislation takes a “common sense” approach to tackling critical issues with electrical infrastructure security, Thompson is quoted as saying in the release. “Any failure of our electric grid, whether intentional or unintentional, would have a significant and potentially devastating impact on our nation,” he said.

The legislation follows a report published earlier this month by The Wall Street Journal that described how cyberspies from China, Russia and elsewhere have gained access to the U.S. electrical grid and installed malware tools that could be used to shut down service.

The story, which quoted unnamed national security and intelligence sources, described the attackers as having deeply penetrated the power infrastructure and poised to cause major disruptions in the event of a crisis or war.

Over the past few years, several others also have warned about the vulnerability of the power infrastructure. In 2007, the Idaho National Laboratory prepared a demonstration for the Department of Homeland Security in which a software vulnerability in a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system was used to cripple a generator.

A video of the demonstration that showed the generator being reduced to a smoking, shuddering hunk of metal aired on CNN, and still remains one of the most potent symbols of just what can go wrong if the power infrastructure is attacked in a cyberwar.

Concerns have prompted calls for mandatory security controls for some time now. For instance, a broad cybersecurity bill introduced recently by Sens. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) and Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) calls, among other things, for regulations mandating baseline security standards in critical infrastructure industries such as the power sector.

The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), which in December delivered a set of cybersecurity recommendations for President Obama, also called for similar regulations in the electric sector.


Posted By Beat The Chip to Beat The Chip at 5/03/2009 04:25:00 PM

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