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14 Lies That Our Psychiatry Professors in Medical School Taught Us

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Duty to Warn

new-logo25kohlsGary G. Kohls, MD

 

 

 

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Myth # 1:

“The FDA (US Food and Drug Administration) tests all new psychiatric drugs”

False. Actually the FDA only reviews studies that were designed, administered, secretly performed and paid for by the multinational profit-driven drug companies. The studies are frequently farmed out by the pharmaceutical companies by well-paid research firms, in whose interest it is to find positive results for their corporate employers. Unsurprisingly, such research policies virtually guarantee fraudulent results.

Myth # 2:

“FDA approval means that a psychotropic drug is effective long-term”

False. Actually, FDA approval doesn’t even mean that psychiatric drugs have been proven to be safe – either short-term or long-term! The notion that FDA approval means that a psych drug has been proven to be effective is also a false one, for most such drugs are never tested – prior to marketing – for longer than a few months (and most psych patients take their drugs for years). The pharmaceutical industry pays many psychiatric “researchers” – often academic psychiatrists (with east access to compliant, chronic, already drugged-up patients) who have financial or professional conflicts of interest – some of them even sitting on FDA advisory committees who attempt to “fast track” psych drugs through the approval process. For each new drug application, the FDA only receives 1 or 2 of the “best” studies (out of many) that purport to show short-term effectiveness. The negative studies are shelved and not revealed to the FDA. In the case of the SSRI drugs, animal lab studies typically lasted only hours, days or weeks and the human clinical studies only lasted, on average, 4- 6 weeks, far too short to draw any valid conclusions about long-term effectiveness or safety!

Hence the FDA, prescribing physicians and patient-victims should not have been “surprised” by the resulting epidemic of SSRI drug-induced adverse reactions that are silently plaguing the nation. Indeed, many SSRI trials have shown that those drugs are barely more effective than placebo (albeit statistically significant!) with unaffordable economic costs and serious health risks, some of which are life-threatening and known to be capable of causing brain damage.

Myth # 3:

 “FDA approval means that a psychotropic drug is safe long-term”

False. Actually, the SSRIs and the “anti-psychotic” drugs are usually tested in human trials for only a couple of months before being granted marketing approval by the FDA. And the drug companies are only required to report 1 or 2 studies (even if many other studies on the same drug showed negative, even disastrous,  results). Drug companies obviously prefer that the black box and fine print warnings associated with their drugs are ignored by both consumers and prescribers. One only has to note how small the print is on the commercials.

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Confessions of a Medical Heretic (Part 3)

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Duty to Warn

new-logo25kohlsBy Gary G. Kohls, MD

“Still psychiatrists went on behaving as if antipsychotics were essentially benign and arguing that they were necessary to prevent an underlying toxic brain disease (7). Andreasen’s 2011 paper was widely publicized however, and it started to be acknowledged that antipsychotics can cause brain shrinkage. Almost as soon as the cat was out of the bag, however, attention was diverted back to the idea that the real problem is the mental condition.”

Part (1)

Part (2)

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Antipsychotic Drugs and Brain Shrinkage

Over the 40 years that I practiced medicine, I slowly became aware of the fact that drugs that cross the blood-brain barrier and thus impact the brain, especially those marketed for so-called mental illnesses (of unknown etiology), only mask symptoms and never cure anything – despite what the attractive, trinket-bearing salespersons from Big Pharma proclaimed as they were trying to convince me to prescribe their latest over-priced drugs (while at the same time abandoning the tried and true cheaper generics I had been using successfully for years).

When I went to medical school, we were taught that the relatively few psychiatric drugs available in the decade of the 1960s were too dangerous for us lowly family practitioners to prescribe safely. However, sometime between then and the generation of the 1980s, Big Pharma started flexing its Big Business muscles, started having previously restricted drugs available over-the-counter, started ignoring the psychiatrists (who coveted the monopoly they had had on psych meds), and started marketing heavily those same dangerous drugs so that we lowly family practitioners would help them increase their “market share”.

Living in a rural area where there were no psychiatrists to make wholesale diagnoses of mental illnesses (of “unknown etiology”) that supposedly warranted life-long drugging, I wasn’t asked by very many of my patients for psych drug treatment. But then came along Prozac.

The one time that I was asked by a patient to prescribe Prozac for her (a so-called selective [a lie] serotonin reuptake inhibitor [SSRI]), I was totally unaware that I had been deceived by Eli Lilly’s commercials and its drug reps when I was told how Prozac was supposed to work. They also skipped over (or were ignorant of) what were the serious potential dangers of the drug, especially the long-term dangers which included suicide, homicide, addiction, brain damage, sleep disorders, mania, psychosis, dementia, permanent sexual dysfunction, etc, etc. That patient didn’t take her Prozac for more than two weeks before it pooped out. But it got me curious about what synthetic, fluorinated, amphetamine-based chemicals like the SSRIs can do to the brain. More

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