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The fact of Ebola now uncontained internationally requires action. What action?

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new-logo25Dick Eastman M.S., M.A.

 

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Action for what purpose? A debate.

Does Ebola deserve the attention it’s been getting lately? Is it as dangerous as some so-called “alarmists” (e.g., Mike Adams, Donald Trump, etc.) are suggesting? Or is it the easily manageable threat others (like the CDC) are proclaiming? Actually, the truth may lie somewhere in the middle.

Ebola as a contagious disease deserves appropriate action. The disease exists and it is on the loose. But there something else in play here. The disease is obviously not being handled intelligently and those whom are generally thought to be the responsible authorities, government, American medicine and the Center for Disease Control are clearly not taking measures to address this un-contained fatal virus.

This president who signed in a medical reform bill that seems to have been written for the profit of the financial sector and the big pharmaceutical companies has not taken the steps that must be taken now. A national quarantine of everyone — with absolute minimization of contact, including schools and, simultaneously, the closing airports and border crossings — except for minimum personal contact imports, say from container ships or trucks carrying products in which the truck drivers are limited in whom they may contact. The system will not be perfect and there is no time to perfect it – it simply must be done now — while containment is still possible. With an incubation period of 20 days and people exposed wandering freely about right now, the option of containment as I have described will not be open for long.

Yes, infectious disease experts may know the most about the viruses that cause Ebola virus disease (EVD) and the other hemorrhagic fever diseases; scientific facts are always preferable to unfounded theories and worst-case prognostication; and some people do attempt to profit/benefit from the hysteria that comes from potential threats. More

Major Organic Seed Company Owned By Pro-GMO Group!

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Barbara H. Peterson

Farm Wars

I recently found out something shocking. This revelation happened as I was meandering through the Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association (OSGATA) website and ran across the “about” page. It just so happens that Joel Reiten is one of the Board of Directors – “Currently seed production manager for Seeds of Change, a division of Mars, one of the world’s largest producers and marketers of 100% organic seed.”  More

Africa: up for grabs The scale and impact of land grabbing for agrofuels

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Friends of the Earth Africa and Friends of the Earth Europe | 30 August 2010

The farming system developed shall respect ecological limits, not lead to climate changing emissions, depletion of the soil and prevent the exhaustion of water supplies. Such systems naturally forbid the use of genetically modified crops or trees.

Executive summary

Access to land provides food and livelihoods for billions of people around the world, but as the availability of fertile land and water is threatened by climate change, mismanagement and consumption patterns, demand for land has been increasing.

“Land grabs” – where land traditionally used by local communities is leased or sold to outside investors (from corporations and from governments) are becoming increasingly common across Africa. Whilst many of these deals are for food cultivation, there is a growing interest in growing crops for fuel – agrofuels – particularly to supply the growing EU market.

These land grabs have been taking place against a backdrop of rising food prices which led to the food crisis in 2008. There were food riots in some developing countries and in Haiti and Madagascar the governments were overthrown as a result of the crisis. Crops being used for agrofuels was a major factor in the rising price of food. More

Buying Africa for a song

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Guardian News & Media (Johannesburg) | Aug 27 2010

KATIE ALLEN

If dodgy emails offering millions in return for your down payment to repatriate a stranded Nigerian astronaut do not tempt you, then maybe this will appeal to your speculative side — a hectare of fertile African land on a 99-year lease — for $1 a year.

Think about it: crop prices are soaring, land is appreciating and importdependent rich nations almost guarantee you a never-ending export market. It’s starting to sound like that Nigerian astronaut deal. But this is not a scam.

Sadly, for anyone who happens to live on that farmland, there are countless examples of African governments handing it over at bargain prices to foreign investors, ranging from hedge funds to biofuel producers. Critics call it land grabbing.

The trend of buying or taking out long-term leases on land first came to prominence during the 2008 world food crisis. As food riots raged across the world, speculators and countries with their own food-security fears quietly sealed deals with African nations. Others call it neocolonialism. More

Bill Gates In the Crosshairs

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In the Crosshairs with Barb Peterson

Bill Gates and Monsanto team up for Africa

Listen here: Bill Gates In the Crosshairs

Theme song by Rocky Frisco

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