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Author, Chuck Frank

You were at home with your family and you had just sat down to have a nice breakfast which included eggs and bacon and a blueberry muffin when there was a knock at the door. You looked out of your window and saw an unmarked car and two people, one of which was wearing camo and you thenwent to the door. It was code enforcement. An undisclosed neighbor had filed an anonymous “complaint” to the county with regard to a vacation rental that had been built which was no larger than an out building and was located above a creek on 37 acres in a small town in Northern California. Code enforcement, a rogue unconstitutional policing unit, introduced themselves as being part of the KGB, excuse my play on words, as I meant to say the Community Development Agency, CDA, which also worked in conjunction with the Building Department, Planning, the Sheriff, his Deputies and a court that favored city and county government, but it became obvious that constitutional and unalienable rights which had been written in stone ever since the early 1800’s, were not included.

The Bill of Rights:
The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers,
and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be
violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported
by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be
searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

Code Enforcement was now on a mission with “seizure fever” while the lead person demanded, with no warrant, that they take a look at the building which was located 1,100 ft. down a gentle slope and rested on a foundation and a flat piece of ground. Yet, this was now the beginning of a long fought battle between one family and a bureaucracy that had not one ounce of mercy but only an agenda that can best be traced to a bunch of two bit players benefiting from the glorified welfare state, while most of them were making an extra $100.00 or more per hour dealing with building department and
planning directives.   Yet, at the same time, city and county codes and ordinances were supported with threats and fines for those who were perhaps out of compliance, and thus, the backdrop of the old and brutal Draconian laws of ancient Greece were now in place and running amok, while ruining countless persons dreams and their livelihoods, but not only in the example below, but in many other cases within the same county, where there is an endless train of code enforcers swarming the land while satellite surveillance is in place to help them focus on their next victim. More


‘We the Prisoners’: The Demise of the Fourth Amendment

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speak truth

By John W. Whitehead

June 28, 2016

“Our carceral state banishes American citizens to a gray wasteland far beyond the promises and protections the government grants its other citizens… When the doors finally close and one finds oneself facing banishment to the carceral state—the years, the walls, the rules, the guards, the inmates—reactions vary. Some experience an intense sickening feeling. Others, a strong desire to sleep. Visions of suicide. A deep shame. A rage directed toward guards and other inmates. Utter disbelief. The incarcerated attempt to hold on to family and old social ties through phone calls and visitations. At first, friends and family do their best to keep up. But phone calls to prison are expensive, and many prisons are located far from one’s hometown… As the visits and phone calls diminish, the incarcerated begins to adjust to the fact that he or she is, indeed, a prisoner. New social ties are cultivated. New rules must be understood.”—Ta-Nehisi Coates, The Atlantic

In a carceral state—a.k.a. a prison state or a police state—there is no Fourth Amendment to protect you from the overreaches, abuses, searches and probing eyes of government overlords.

In a carceral state, there is no difference between the treatment meted out to a law-abiding citizen and a convicted felon: both are equally suspect and treated as criminals, without any of the special rights and privileges reserved for the governing elite.

In a carceral state, there are only two kinds of people: the prisoners and the prison guards.

With every new law enacted by federal and state legislatures, every new ruling handed down by government courts, and every new military weapon, invasive tactic and egregious protocol employed by government agents, “we the people”—the prisoners of the American police state—are being pushed that much further into a corner, our backs against the prison wall.

This concept of a carceral state in which we possess no rights except for that which the government grants on an as-needed basis is the only way I can begin to comprehend, let alone articulate, the irrational, surreal, topsy-turvy, through-the-looking-glass state of affairs that is being imposed upon us in America today.

As I point out in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People, we who pretend we are free are no different from those who spend their lives behind bars.

Indeed, we are experiencing much the same phenomenon that journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates ascribes to those who are banished to a “gray wasteland far beyond the promises and protections the government grants its other citizens” : a sickening feeling, a desire to sleep, hopelessness, shame, rage, disbelief, clinginess to the past and that which is familiar, and then eventually resignation and acceptance of our new “normal.”

All that we are experiencing—the sense of dread at what is coming down the pike, the desperation, the apathy about government corruption, the deeply divided partisanship, the carnivalesque political spectacles, the public displays of violence, the nostalgia for the past—are part of the dying refrain of an America that is fading fast.

No longer must the government obey the law.

Likewise, “we the people” are no longer shielded by the rule of law.

While the First Amendment—which gives us a voice—is being muzzled, the Fourth Amendment—which protects us from being bullied, badgered, beaten, broken and spied on by government agents—is being disemboweled. More

Wisconsin continues its assault against independent agriculture


Paul Griepentrog (C) copyright 2010 All Rights Reserved

Wisconsin Reports


As it was my intent to deliver three articles in sequence I found my life had again been invaded Thursday morning by an act of vandalism, a person or persons unknown to me entered my barn (burglary) released my animals (a felony in Wisconsin) and opened the doors to the grain storage areas allowing the animals to engorge themselves with grain.  This occurrence coincided with other acts of aggression to individuals opposed to the comprehensive land use plan.  There were three snowmobiles operating unlawfully on the road that night, in the past anyone complaining about such activity has been subject to acts of aggression, as in one case where the complainant had a snowmobiler drive into his driveway and discharge a firearm at his house.   More


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