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Nearly 100,000 Pentagon Whistleblower’s Complaints Have Been Silenced

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Article of 17 April 2019 by Lee Camp on Pentagon Whistleblower Complaints

I don’t know if I’d have the nerve to be a whistleblower. I’d like to think I would. We all like to think we would, just like we all like to think we could catch the game-winning touchdown, triumph on “America’s Got Talent,” and fold a fitted sheet quickly and without cursing.

But to blow the whistle on a huge organization with a lot of power, likely drawing that power to come crashing down on your head—that takes some serious spine-age. Now, imagine the organization you’re calling out is arguably the largest, most powerful, most secretive and most violent organization on planet Earth. I’m speaking, of course, of the U.S. Department of Defense.

Yet thousands, even tens of thousands, of people have taken that step over the past five years. (More on this in a moment.)

All the while our organized human murder machine continues its work around the world. Every day. Every hour. Never a moment of rest. Never pausing to clip their toenails or scratch their ass. Bombs dropped. Buildings blown up. People killed or imprisoned. No end in sight.

By the way, that’s the term I like to use instead of “military”—Organized Human Murder Machine.

It has a nice ring to it, doesn’t it? “Mili-tary” sounds too boring, too banal. Sounds like a super-lame couple you met at a party. “Yeah, Millie and Terry over there are accountants. If I have to hear one more joke about capital gains taxes, I’m gonna kill myself.”

But that’s not what the military is. The military is a gigantic organized human murder machine, and even if you “support” every action our military has ever taken, you can still acknowledge it’s an organized human murder machine. (You would just bizarrely argue that all the murder has been just and sound and pure.)

Eleven months ago I covered $21 trillion of unaccounted-for adjustments at the Pentagon over the past 20 years. Don’t try to think about the number $21 trillion because you’ll pass out and hit your head on the desk. If your salary is $40,000 a year, in order to earn $21 trillion, it would take you 525 million years. (At which point you can’t even enjoy the new jet ski you just bought with all your money because you’re almost certainly a brain in a jar … though a nice embroidered jar that only the rich brains can afford.)

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Wyden Statement on the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Whistleblower Protection Act

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April 10, 2019

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Mr. President, thirty years ago today, the Whistleblower Protection Act was signed into law. To call it a triumph doesn’t do justice to the sheer number of years and people it took on both sides of the aisle to overcome numerous obstacles and enact federal protections for federal government employees who step forward and do what we all should do: expose wrongdoings in order to hold government officials and agencies accountable.

Congressional efforts to protect whistleblowers date back to at least 1912 with the enactment of the Lloyd-La Follette Act of 1912. This act guaranteed the right of federal employees to communicate with members of Congress without the oversight of their employer, and prohibited compensation to managers who retaliated against employees attempting to disclose whistleblower matters.

However, empowering Federal employees to speak up and speak the truth was, and continues to be, an ongoing struggle, one that has often pitted Congress against the Executive Branch. When President George H.W. Bush signed the Whistleblower Protection Act into law that April morning in 1989, it came after his predecessor President Ronald Reagan had vetoed a similar bill despite the fact that it had been unanimously adopted by both the Senate and the House.

The Whistleblower Protection Act, itself, was first introduced by Representative Pat Schroeder of Colorado as an amendment to the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 and then as a stand-alone bill in 1982. The principal purpose of the bill was to block retaliation against employees who came forward, a never-ending problem. The bill would have allowed “a person claiming to be aggrieved by a prohibited personnel practice to: (1) bring a civil action in a U.S. district court against the employee or agency involved (respondent); or (2) seek corrective action through the (Merit Systems Protection) Board.”

While that particular bill ultimately died after receiving unfavorable comments from the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the Merit Systems Protection Board, which adjudicates whistleblower complaints, its failure didn’t deter our colleagues from persevering. More

TS Radio Network: Whistleblower’s! Montgomery County Pennsylvania Exploiting the Elderly #1

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Join us this evening April 4, 2019 at 7:00 pm CST!

Listen live →(HERE)

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TS Radio Network: Whistleblower’s! The USDA Hour

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Join us this evening March 28, 2019 at 7:00 pm CST!

Listen live →(HERE)

Call in # 917-388-4520

Press #1 to speak to the guest

All TS Radio shows are available in archive 24/7

Hosted by Marti Oakley with Lawrence Lucas

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Whistleblower’s is presented in coordination with Marcel Reid and the annual Whistleblower’s Summit July 29, 30 and 31st in Washington, D.C.

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Lawrence Lucas and I host Lesa Donnelly and Ron Cotton as we discuss recent updates in the Women of Forestry Service and ongoing issues with the USDA in general.  The continuing failure of the USDA to respond to more than 20 years of reported sexual harassment and retaliation for reporting incidences of abuse, allows these egregious acts to continue without penalty.  We we also be discussing the ongoing disparity of treatment and access to programs that affects minority farmers; a system that has resulted in more than 2 million acres of agricultural land stolen from the rightful owners.

Tune in as we update and recap the current state of affairs with regards to the USDA and its failure to function appropriately.

Lesa donnelly: vice president, USDA Coalition of Minority Employees, representative & spokesperson for abused women & class complainants (Forest Service in the western region).

Full House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform held yet another hearing on November 15, 2018 to address the rampant and decades long history of sexual misconduct including documented cases of molestation, rape, gender discrimination and retaliation and intimidation for reporting these abuses.

Ron Cotton is President of the USDA Coalition of Minority Employees which is a USDA sanctioned, independent employee resource organization that works to ensure respect, dignity, and equal opportunities for employees and farmers.

Lawrence Lucas, Founding member and President Emeritus, of the USDA Coalition of Minority employees since May 1994.
The USDA Coalition of Minority Employees and the Black farmers, representing 13 southern states. Lawrence is a regular guest on TS Radio Network and will co-host the last Thursday of every month to update us on the issues with USDA.

TS Radio Network: Whistleblower’s! Oklahoma prison reform

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TS Radio Network: VA Whistleblower’s with guest Jamie Fox

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TS Radio Network: Tanya TalkS– The Rally in OK City Mar. 14th

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