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Why does the government controlled education system keep trying to reinvent the knowledge wheel?

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A NATION BEGUILED

www.arkansasfreedom.com

The more they manipulate, the more distorted & unwieldy it becomes.

By Barbara McCutchen

For Pete’s sake, some of the most esteemed educators in the history of the world taught in the 300’s B.C.  Socrates set up a basis for learning by the use of hypothesis & questioning until a non-contradictory answer could be reached…a method used in science & law studies for centuries. Then there was Plato and his student Aristotle (the father of Reason & individuality) and his Lyceum (place of lectures & learning).  How many students can even tell you who they were?

These efforts/achievements finally led to the Age of Enlightenment (e.g. John Locke), hence advancement in every field of endeavor, through the Industrial Revolution which lifted the standard of living for the masses within its sphere.

In other words the basis for teaching, developing challenging curricula was the bedrock from which Western Civilization and…

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HOPE FOR TOMORROW: AMERICAN SCHOOLS

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new-logo251_002Author,  Chuck Frank

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 It is no secret that failing American schools, as a whole, has been influenced for decades by the hard progressive left and what exactly was the fruit that came from this diseased tree? 

Let’s take a look.

One source in 2015, the Washington Post, tells us the following with regard to students.

“Surely one reason why so many Americans lack writing skills is that, for decades, most U.S. schools failed to teach them. Back in 2011, a nationwide test found that only 24 percent of the students in 8th and 12th grades were proficient in writing, and just 3 percent were advanced…The Education Trust recently studied more than 1,200 middle school writing assignments to see whether they aligned with the Common Core standard and faulted them in part because they didn’t require students to write at length.”  We are talking short and medium essays.
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Why do homeschoolers oppose the Common Core?

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Dear Members and Friends,

Why do homeschoolers oppose the Common Core?

Because we’ve discovered that freedom is the key to educational success. Freedom gives us the flexibility to help our students find their own pace, discover their passions, develop their talents, and learn to excel.

In “What We Can Learn from Homeschooling,” Melanie Borrego, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Education at Bradman University, explains an educational truth—which often goes without saying for homeschoolers:

An education should not look exactly the same for every student. Some need more guidance, others less. Some want to build things, others like to read. Some want to play geography games with children from other countries . . . others would prefer to learn outside or by listening and observing. Some need more time to complete their studies, others will graduate early. . . . If we can gradually build both flexibility and autonomy into their education, particularly as they grow older and their interests and abilities begin to deepen, we will see more engagement in and understanding of the material.

Home education’s success is a compelling counterpoint to the Common Core. When educational elites in ivory towers dictate their untested, one-size-fits-all standards and skills for all students, kids find their individuality smothered, their learning stifled, and their success uncertain. The Common Core’s top-down paradigm restricts teachers’ choices and flexibility, and it leaves parents feeling angry, perplexed, and powerless to help their children.

But parents are fighting back. Last September, a group of concerned citizens in Missouri filed a lawsuit against Governor Jeremiah Nixon, challenging a Common Core–based test development group—Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC)—as an unconstitutional state compact.

This past February, a state circuit court agreed that Missouri’s SBAC fees were unconstitutional, and permanently banned the state from paying taxpayer dollars to SBAC. The court held that “the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium . . . is an unlawful interstate compact to which the U.S. Congress has never consented, whose existence and operation violate the Compact Clause of the U.S. Constitution, Article I, § 10, cl. 3, as well as numerous federal statutes; and that Missouri’s participation in the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium as a member is unlawful under state and federal law.”

The state appealed the decision in March.

Now, HSLDA is joining the legal battle by filing an amicus (friend of the court) brief urging the judges to confirm that SBAC is unconstitutional.

The Missouri ruling has tremendous potential to influence the battle over the Common Core. Prior to the ruling, the Missouri legislature had already begun to tap the brakes on the Common Core. When the court decision came down, lawmakers promptly shut down all future funding for SBAC. A similar lawsuit has already been filed in North Dakota.

HSLDA’s amicus brief urges the Court of Appeals to recognize SBAC for what it is: a key component in a larger strategy, enticing states to act as federal proxies in the development of top-down national standards and assessments. (The United States Department of Education is banned from directly developing national curriculum or tests.)

Our brief also points out that mandates tied to federal funding for Common Core–related initiatives essentially create an invasive nationwide tracking system. Such a model is capable of following every student from preschool through college and even into employment. As we said in our brief:

The most immediate threat to homeschool and private school students is the expansion of statewide longitudinal databases. Over the past decade, a slew of new federal incentives and funded data models have spurred states to monitor students’ early years, performance in college, and success in the workforce by following “individuals systematically and efficiently across state lines.” . . .

The designers of the new systems fully intend for homeschool and private school students to be part of the massive data collection. At the National Conference on Student Assessment in 2011, officials from Oklahoma discussed how the challenge of meeting the data requirements of federal and state education policies [is] motivating them to “include student groups not now included (e.g., home-schooled) in the data system.”1

The legal battle over the Common Core is just beginning. If other states follow the example of Missouri and North Dakota, we expect to see more suits challenging these top-down databases and testing regimes. At the same time, the Common Core’s proponents will fight back, refining their legal strategies and amassing resources to protect their projects.

If we want to dislodge encroaching centralized control from America’s education system, our lawmakers and judges need to know the truth: the Common Core represents the very antithesis of educational freedom and innovation. But we need your help to spread this vital message.

Would you consider donating to the Homeschool Freedom Fund? Your gift will empower us to continue our efforts to thwart the Common Core and preserve educational freedom.

The untested Common Core State Standards, along with myopic assessments and invasive data monitoring, strip states, teachers, and parents of innovation and flexibility. America needs educated, free-thinking citizens—not mindless drones trained to accept the dictates of an administrative collective.

Won’t you stand with us to get the truth out about the Common Core?

For freedom,
Jim Mason, Vice President for Litigation and Development

DONATE NOW!

1 From “Data, Data Everywhere: Progress, Challenges, and Recommendations for State Data Systems,” presented by Jennifer Stegman at the National Conference on Student Assessment on June 20, 2011.

CCHR: Opposition to the Common Core State Standards is growing

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Citizens Commission on Human Rights of St. Louis

CCHR STL Blog and News Archive

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 “As a result of psychiatric and psychological intervention in schools, harmful behaviorist programs and psychotropic (mind-altering) drugs now decimate our schools. These programs have trampled on the rights and roles of parents and have provided society with rising crime, drug abuse and suicide rates.”

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Opposition to the Common Core State Standards is growing

Four states — Texas, Virginia, Alaska, and Nebraska — have not adopted the Common Core State Standards for public school curricula and testing. Minnesota chose to adopt only the English standards and declined the Mathematics standards.

Nine states which had previously adopted the Standards — Missouri, Kansas, Michigan, Georgia, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Alabama, South Carolina, Utah — are having second thoughts about it in one form or another. For example, in Missouri:

HB 616 “Prohibits the State Board of Education from adopting and implementing the standards for public schools developed by the Common Core Standards Initiative” was introduced by Representative Kurt Bahr (R-102) although it did not come to a vote during the legislative session just ended.
SB 210 “Requires the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to hold public meetings in each congressional district on the Common Core State Standards” was introduced by Senator John Lamping (R-24) although it did not come to a final vote during the legislative session just ended.

In May, the Texas House of Representatives voted 140-2 to pass language prohibiting Texas from participating in the standards. Texas, however, has never adopted the standards and likely will not.

One flaw of Common Core seems to be around the assessment tests, and the maxim that “what gets tested gets taught.”

high_school_curriculum_cover-219x300Critics also say that the whole Common Core effort is a backdoor way of establishing a national school curriculum, taking educational decisions away from the states. Amendment X to the Constitution of the United States, states that, “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” This is taken to mean, in this context, that a national educational curriculum mandate is in violation of the Constitution. Of course, proponents of Common Core point out that these Standards are developed and run by the states, not by the federal government. On the other hand, opponents of Common Core consider it as an end-run around having a federally mandated curriculum; in other words, while it is not officially a federal mandate, there are most certainly federal incentives (read “federal dollars”) for those states who implement it. More

Minnesota Schools: Common Core and Mental Health

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new-logo25Marti Oakley       © 2014 All Rights Reserved

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“Each bill appears to be based on the self-sustaining quota systems used by Child Protective Services and Adult Protective Services estimating the number of individuals they anticipate herding through the system in order to fulfill estimated quarterly quotas tied directly to continued funding, grants and subsidies.”

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The active attack on public education through the Common Core curriculum has now taken one giant step forward as Minnesota and other states passed aggressive mental health laws directed at our children. Several additional public schools in the state will now have [mental health] clinics on site as the programs become established; clinics that will be used to aggressively label the greatest number of children possible as having one or more mental disorders. Tied to these bills are massive government subsidies and other targeted funding.

28681_1thIn other words, our children will be traded for dollars regardless of the lifelong damage that will be the result from the assessment of fictional mental disorders; an assessment which will follow them for the rest of their lives whether real or just imagined by a mental health provider. Many will become dependent on the highly addictive psychotropic drugs known as neuroleptics and will suffer from a myriad of adverse side affects.

Project AWARE :Advancing Wellness and Resilience in Education

This federal level project would have been more aptly titled “schools collecting allocated money for kids”, or the SCAMkids project.

“Dr. Karen Effrem, president of the national watchdog group, Education Liberty Watch, is sounding an alarm about Common Core, the federal education standards that almost all states are adopting by accepting federal “Race to the Top” funding. Under Common Core, Effrem said, students’ personal information increasingly is being collected, measured and assessed while the standards shift the focus away from academics and toward psychological training and testing of personal attitudes and behaviors. “

Minnesota alone has allocated 45 million to jump-start the psychological training of kids:

Under five-year grant contracts with the department, 36 mental health organizations will provide school-linked mental health services to approximately 35,000 students in more than 800 schools across 257 school districts and 82 counties by 2018. More than half of those students will receive mental health services for the first time.

Why does that statement make me cringe? Maybe its the unfettered access to more than 35,000 students and the ensuing data mining that will also be relentlessly conducted, and stored in permanent lifetime files for easy access by insurance companies, federal and state agencies and eventual employers. More

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