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EMBRYONIC JOURNEY

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Author,
Chuck Frank

Quite a few years ago PPJ Gazette republished one of my articles which dealt with ecological and environmental issues with regard to saving the Yellow Legged Frog and the Yosemite Toad in the Sierra Nevada Mountain range situated in the higher mountains of California. The concern of the Fish and Wildlife agency at the time was saving those two species who’s populations were supposedly dwindling because of certain species of trout which were supposedly eating the tadpoles before they could develop.

Consequently, a plan to eradicate thousands of fish in the Sierra streams and lakes was undertaken. The eradication was either done though electrocution, netting, or poisoning the water. Finally, one million of these acres affected and their waterways and lakes were designated for the Yellow legged frog and the Yosemite toad, even when no hard evidence of a connection between trout and tadpoles had been found.

However, the point here is that even though fish and anglers were affected there was no mercy for the fish who was seen as the hypothetical and unwanted predator and meant to finally be eradicated. This kind of thinking which was then evident and now more than ever, shows far more concern for the life of a frog than other forms of life. And I may add that the direction that the country is presently going lends itself to an even greater concern which is now the life of the unborn child. More

Sick Kids Hospital Toronto will euthanize children with or without parental consent.

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Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

Alex Schadenberg
Executive Director – Euthanasia Prevention Coalition

A recent report from the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto states that they are not only ready to do euthanasia on children but their policy states that a child should be able to die by euthanasia without the consent or knowledge of the parents.

According to an article by Sharon Kirkey for Sun Media, the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto published their policy on euthanasia and assisted suicide as a report in the recent Journal of Medical Ethics. According to Kirkey:

The Sick Kids’ working group says the hospital has willing doctors who could “safely and effectively” perform euthanasia for terminally ill youth 18 and older who meet the criteria as set out in federal law, and that it would be “antithetical” to its philosophy of care to have to transfer these patients to a strange and unfamiliar adult hospital. But it is a suggestion that euthanasia might one day take place without the involvement of parents that has provoked fresh controversy in the assisted-death debate.

Who does the Hospital for Sick Children believe that euthanasia can be safe and effective for?

Kirkey explains that the ethicists at the Children’s Hospital believe that there is no difference between killing someone and letting them die. Clearly there is a difference between allowing a natural death and actually causing the death of a person. By blurring clear distinctions ethicists minimize the ethical problems associated with doctors killing their patients. Kirkey reports:

The working group said it wasn’t convinced that there is a meaningful difference for the patient “between being consensually assisted in dying (in the case of MAID) and being consensually allowed to die (in the case of refusing life-sustaining interventions).”

Kirkey explains that most Canadian provinces allow mature minors to make decisions about their own care, including withdrawing or withholding life support. She explains that in Ontario a minor can provide consent for treatment or withdrawal of treatment if they understand the “reasonably foreseeable consequences” of their decision. The Sick Kids’ hospital stated that they encourage minors to involve their families in medical decisions.

Kirkey explains that the Hospitals for Sick Children is suggesting that children could decide to die by euthanasia without the consent of the parents:

The draft policy argues the same rules should apply to MAID since there is no meaningful ethical or practical distinction from the patient’s perspective between assisted dying and other procedures that result in the end of a life, such as palliative sedation (where people sleep until they die) or withdrawing or withholding life-sustaining treatments.

Kirkey explains that the Sick Kids Hospital paper came out just ahead of the report by The Canadian Council of Academies that will make recommendations in December concerning the extension of euthanasia to mature minors. The same group is examining the extension of euthanasia to cases of mental illness alone, as well as incompetent people who requested euthanasia within an “advance directive”.

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