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Contact Congress Now Regarding HR2 Stop Wireless in Rural America

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Contact Congress Now Regarding HR2
– Stop Wireless in Rural America –
Call the Leaders of the Joint Conference Committee Today to Stop Wireless Broadband Deployment in Rural America
H.R.2  is a Farm Bill that has passed both the Senate and the House. Next Wednesday, September 5th it will be reviewed by a Joint Conference Committee of both the House and the Senate to work out differences before forwarding it to the President.
We want to ask for wired DSL and fiber optics connection to the home, not undependable and unhealthy wireless in rural communities. WE WANT THE FOLLOWING SECTIONS TAKEN OUT OF THE FARM BILL:
House Joint Conference Committee
Wed, Sep 05, 2018
9:30 AM – SR-325
As listed on the agenda: Meeting of conferees on H.R.2, to provide for the reform and continuation of agricultural and other programs of the Department of Agriculture through fiscal year 2023.
Most Importantly, Please Call and/or
Email the Following Chairmen and
Ranking Members.
 
Ask that internet connections remain wired through fiber optics, landlines or ethernet to the home which is a much safer, faster and more cybersecure than wireless communication.
Agriculture Committee Chairmen & Ranking Members:
Chairman
Sen. Pat Roberts, R-Kansas – 202-224-4774
Rep. K. Michael Conaway, R-Texas – 202-225-3605
Chief of Staff – Mark.Williams@mail.house.gov
Ranking Members
Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Michigan – 202-224-4822
Rep. Collin Peterson, D-Minnesota – 202-225-2165
Chief of Staff – Allison.Myhre@mail.house.gov
(We have listed the staff emails for the 4 ranking members of the Agricultural Committee – access by clicking on their names)
You can also contact the rest of the committee attendees.
There are 56 attendees in total, listed below.
Their telephone numbers and staff emails are listed in the
Password: 1620771415
Click HERE for instructions on how to use the Directory
Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kansas – See contact info above
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky – 202-224-2541
Senator John Boozman, R-Arkansas – (202) 224-4843
Senator John Hoeven, R-North Dakota – (202) 224-2551 Chief of Staff: Ryan Bernstein email: Ryan_Bernstein@Hoeven.Senate.Gov
Senator Joni Ernst, R-Iowa – (202) 224-3254
Ranking Member Debbie Stabenow, D-Michigan – See contact info above
Senator Patrick Leahy, D-Vermont – (202) 224-4242
Senator Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio- (202) 224-2315
Senator Heidi Heitkamp, D-North Dakota – (202) 224-2043
House Republican Conferees
House Agriculture Committee Conferees:
Chairman Mike Conaway (TX-11) – See contact info above
Glenn ‘GT’ Thompson (PA-05)
Bob Goodlatte (VA-06)
Frank Lucas (OK-03)
Mike Rogers (AL-03)
Austin Scott (GA-08)
Rick Crawford (AR-01)
Vicky Hartzler (MO-04)
Rodney Davis (IL-13)
Ted Yoho (FL-03)
David Rouzer (NC-07)
Roger Marshall (KS-01)
Jodey Arrington (TX-19)
PO Box 6574
Santa Fe NM 87502
USA
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Inconvenient Truths About This Year’s Duluth Air Show: Squandering the Planet’s Increasingly Scarce Fossil Fuels for our Amusement

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Duty to Warn

By Gary G. Kohls, MD – July 7, 2018

 

“Knowledge is power; but who hath duly Considered the power of Ignorance? Knowledge slowly builds up what Ignorance in an hour pulls down. Knowledge, through patient and frugal centuries, enlarges discovery and makes record of it; Ignorance, wanting its day’s dinner, lights a fire with the record, and gives a flavor to its one roast with the burned souls of many generations.” — George Eliot, from the author’s last novel, Daniel Deronda

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The Big Oil cartels have, for decades, been poisoning the air, the aquifers, the rivers, the lakes the air, the soil and the Gulf of Mexico, the Persian Gulf and every ocean and ocean floor on the planet with uncounted millions of gallons of toxic crude oil via their risky – and very leaky – deep water oil wells. It wasn’t just the crime against the planet that British Petroleum and Dick Cheney’s Halliburton perpetrated in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. There are many other entities that have contributed to the mortal wounding of the Gulf, and one of the big ones is the US military.

A prime example of the damage done to the Gulf by corporate entities includes the Mississippi River delta’s massive dead zone that has been enlarging rapidly for decades, thanks to the many corporate polluters that have been dumping industrial waste, herbicides, insecticides, fertilizers, prescription drugs and other toxins into surface water streams and rivers (and aquifers also) to flow downstream from such professedly “environmentally friendly” states like Minnesota and its multitude of Big Oil, Big Chemical and Big Agribusiness-co-opted (or duped) farmers. Big Businesses like those meet the definition of sociopaths and therefore must be recognized as conscienceless.

There are hundreds of enlarging dead zones at the mouths of all of the world’s major rivers, but much of the pollution that caused the huge dead zone at the Mississippi River’s mouth started in the Upper Midwest’s farmlands. Especially guilty were the corporate-controlled mega-farms that routinely over-used synthetic herbicides, fertilizers and pesticides on the crops and soil. (See www.geoengineeringwatch.org for more details.)

As I was growing up, I often fished in the upper Minnesota River. Just during my adolescent years, I witnessed the beginnings of the pollution of that river because of farm chemical runoff. I saw the river go from swimmable and fishable to muddy, smelly, toxic and relatively fishless. More

As Industry Pushes Billion-Dollar Fracked Petrochemical Projects, State Regulators Struggle To Keep Up

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Source:  desmogblog

“Pollution from petrochemicals is already a major issue, Food and Water Watch noted in a report last year on the coming build-out. “In 1999, when Houston’s ozone levels were the highest in the nation, the state of Texas conducted several studies that found large industrial leaks,” that report found. “The worst originated from cracker plants producing ethylene and propylene.”

By Sharon Kelly

Fueled by fracking in the region, petrochemical and plastics projects in the Ohio River Valley are attracting tens of billions of dollars in investment, but as plans for this build-out hit the drawing boards, signs already are emerging that state regulators are unprepared for this next wave of industrialization. And the implications of their inexperience could mean major threats to the region’s health and environment.

One of the projects currently underway, an underground natural gas liquids (NLG) storage site — designed to support the construction of several huge petrochemical complexes — is undergoing review by state regulators who have little experience with NGL storage facilities of its size.

“We had to juggle a lot of regulatory input in a relatively undefined setting since there are few regulations in Ohio, and that really goes for Pennsylvania and West Virginia as well,” Jonathan Farrell, a project manager with Civil and Environmental Consultants, told attendees at a petrochemical industry conference on June 18.

That lack of well-established state regulations harkens back to the early days of the shale gas rush, when state regulators struggled to keep up with the emergence of hydraulic fracturing (fracking) and horizontal drilling technologies. The rush to drill while safeguards were still being designed and implemented led to inadequately treated toxic waste being dumped into drinking water supplies for millions of people and problems with radioactive waste that continue to this day.

Dreams of a New Petrochemical Corridor

Shell’s ethane cracker petrochemical plant under construction on the banks of the Ohio River. Credit: Ashley Braun, DeSmog

Today, the petrochemical industry is dreaming big about prospects for manufacturing plastics, styrofoam, vinyl, chemicals, and fertilizers from cheap ethane and other natural gas liquids from the Marcellus Shale — marketed as currently the cheapest in the world.

The goal? To build a new petrochemical corridor in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, and the surrounding region, one second only in size to the Gulf Coast’s — and one that could bring along with it the public health and environmental impacts that have given rise to that region’s reputation as a “cancer alley.”

I think the magnitude of some of these projects that we’re talking about here are hard for a lot of us and a lot of our communities to wrap their head around,” Chad Riley, CEO of The Thrasher Group, an oil and gas field and pipeline services firm, said at the June 18-19 conference. “I really think that this region lacks a bit of an understanding about what the potential could be here.”

Fracking for Plastics

Shale drillers in the Marcellus and Utica have long talked up the potential profits to be made from drilling for “wet gas,” or wells that produce large volumes of natural gas liquids like ethane, propane, and butane. Those liquid fossil fuels offer additional sources of revenue, making the shale drilling industry better able to cope with depressed prices for natural gas, which is mostly methane, that the wells primarily produce.

For the shale industry, the need to create demand for those products is fueling the push to create new petrochemical and plastics plants that can buy up the liquids coming from fracked wells. The Appalachian region currently produces roughly a third of the domestic supply of NGLs, or roughly a million barrels a day.  Read the rest of this article HERE.

THE YOSEMITE 2013 RIM FIRE REVISITED: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT ?

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  Author,
Chuck Frank
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Only last week I passed through Yosemite National Park only to find, miles upon miles of blacked burned trees still standing, that were left over from the 2013 Rim Fire.  The Rim Fire, like the “let it burn” Yellowstone Fire (1988) was a complete disaster, and I believe John Muir and President Teddy Roosevelt who together created Yosemite as America’s first National Park would be asking some tough questions of why preventative measures were never put into place to protect the most beautiful park in the world for future generations.  The Rim fire, the third-largest blaze in recorded state history scorched more than 250,000 acres in and around Yosemite National Park.

“The fire also had a devastating environmental effect that biologists said probably transformed the forest for decades to come.”
The LA Tmes.

I was taken back while passing through the park and witnessed first hand the clean up “progress.”  I was appalled by the lack of restoration, while at the same time I saw no conservation measures or tree planting even taking place, nor did I see “sustainable development” as an avenue to bring back the park to its natural form.

For the record,  “sustainable development is a measure that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs…” Ref. International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)  In this instance, the catastrophic Rim Fire event and aftermath does not even come close to meeting the criteria of sustainable development because, by their own admission, (IISD) wants to preserve the environment for future generations but this is not being done with regard to the forest service’s own flawed blueprint which adversely affects not only rural public lands but forested private properties as well. More

The Battle to Protect Nebraska Land from Big OIL

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Make sure your voice is heard. Sign-on to stop Keystone XL.

Marti —

While we are continuing to challenge the Trump administration’s rubber-stamp approval of the federal permit for Keystone XL in the courts, Trump’s State Department recently opened a public comments docket for an “Environmental Assessment” of the new Mainline Alternative route for KXL in Nebraska.

This new route includes land in Nebraska counties that has never before undergone environmental review, and where landowners never knew until now — after all the years of public hearings and submitting comments — that KXL might be plowing through their farms, and had no due process and chance to make their voices heard.

Basically, there’s a huge list of problems with this illegal review. It’s an attempt to shoe-horn a review of private property in Nebraska by a federal agency with no authority over that land, into an illegally outdated environmental review of KXL from 2014, in clear violation of the bedrock National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

But we still need to make our voices heard. Despite this illegal sham review process that’s been set in motion — which we will continue to fight in the courts — it’s critical that Nebraskans especially, but all Pipeline Fighters sign on and tell the Trump administration they are opposed to Keystone XL.

Action: Sign-on to Bold’s #NoKXL comment to Trump’s State Department.

We’ve composed a sample comment you can sign-on to, that covers all the bases on protesting this illegal process with the same arguments our attorneys are using in court, and includes key issues of concern for Nebraska’s land, water and property rights, and sovereign rights of Indigenous nations. You may also edit the language, or add your own personal statement to the comment.

*Important: If you are a landowner on the new “Mainline Alternative” route, please contact mark@boldnebraska.org for assistance with submitting your comment. For instance, if you have water crossings, or known endangered species or wildlife habitat on your land, be sure to include exact locations and detailed information about them in your comments. 

The deadline to submit a public comment is June 25th. 

Act now: Sign on to Bold’s #NoKXL comment.

Thanks for standing with us. 

Mark and the Bold team

P.S. Chip in to support Bold’s work to stop Keystone XL.

@Bold Nebraska on Twitter
Bold Nebraska on Facebook

Bold Nebraska
208 S. Burlington Ave., Ste 103, Box 325
Hastings, NE 68901 US

 

Former Central Banker: Oil Pipeline Protesters Will Be Killed. So Be It.

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(CD) — As Canada’s controversial Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project faces ongoing opposition, the former governor of the Bank of Canada said that protesters may die but that the government should push the project through anyway.

Speaking at an event Wednesday, David Dodge said, “We’re going to have some very unpleasant circumstances,” the Edmonton Journal reported. “There are some people that are going to die in protesting construction of this pipeline. We have to understand that.”

“Nevertheless, we have to be willing to enforce the law once it’s there,” Dodge said. “It’s going to take some fortitude to stand up.”

In an interview with the Journal, he elaborated by saying, “We have seen it other places, that equivalent of religious zeal leading to flouting of the law in a way that could lead to death.”

Dodge’s comments prompted outrage from climate activists.

Author and 350-org co-founder Bill McKibben warned, “North American governments have shown the ‘fortitude’ necessary to kill indigenous people often enough that this is no idle threat,” while Canandian author Naomi Klein called the threat a “disgrace.” She added, “If the worst happens, we now know they went into this with their eyes wide open.”

Greenpeace climate and energy campaigner Mike Hudema, meanwhile, wondered if Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau would weigh in on Dodge’s remarks.

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John Horning, Exec Dir. of WildEarth Guardians, on the war on wildlife and the environment (Wild Horse & Burro Radio, Wed., 6/13/18)

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painy

Wild_Horse_Burro_Radio_LogoJoin us for Wild Horse Wednesdays®, Wednesday, June 13, 2018

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