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Who Is Your Doctor?

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April 2nd, 2019

Who Is Your Doctor?

by: Jane M. Orient, M.D.

People used to know who their doctor was. His name and phone number were on the wall or the refrigerator next to the telephone. He was there for you and could manage most of your problems.

When I was about 13, my mom took me to our pediatrician for belly pain. He was on his way out the door, but he stopped to take care of me. He diagnosed appendicitis based on history and physical examination. He called his favorite surgeon (“Billy,” a Tucson legend), who came from the golf course to meet me in the emergency room. Within hours, my red-hot appendix was in a jar. My parents paid the hospital bill ($150—10 days’ pay for a construction laborer) as I was discharged a few days later.

Today, the patient with abdominal pain could wait for hours to see the ER provider—possibly a nurse practitioner or physician assistant who had never seen a case of acute appendicitis. She’ll probably get a CT scan, after another wait. Eventually, Dr. On-call may take her to the operating room, hopefully before the appendix ruptures. And the bill will be beyond the means of ordinary people.

I used to be able to direct-admit patients from my office and send them with a set of orders to the hospital admitting office. For years, this has been impossible. The hospital is decidedly unfriendly to independent doctors. There’s now a gatekeeper in the emergency room, and most patients are under the control of a hospitalist. More

TS Radio Network: Dialysis Advocates with Arlene Mullin # 10

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Join us this evening April 2, 2019 at 7:00 pm CST!

5:00pm PST..6:00pm MST..7:00pm CST..8:00pm EST

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What is the consequence of the kidney shortage?

It is a catastrophe.  We conservatively estimate that each year 43,000 patients suffer on dialysis and die prematurely because of the shortage.  That’s equivalent to 85 fully loaded 747s crashing each year.  That’s 118 patients dying each day.  Since 1988 (when data collection began) almost 1 million patients have suffered and died prematurely because of the shortage.

All patient cases have been documented and verified for accuracy.

Lisa Baxter is a Dialysis Patient and author of “Through the Eyes of a Dialysis Patient” a book on her experiences as a patient. She is President and founder of Blessed Kidneys Connection which she founded in 2010. Lisa has her own Youtube channel dealing with Dialysis issues. She graduated with a Associates Degree from Empire State College. She works in the Social Service Field and loves to work with people. She is an advocate for anyone needing help. In 1995 she was diagnosed with Polycystic Kidney Disease and went on dialysis in 2004. Lisa decided to become an advocate for patients and family members. She produced a DVD “Life on Dialysis” in 2009 her story on dialysis.

 

Arlene Mullin — advocate, 20 years experience guiding patients and their families through all aspects of End Stage Renal Disease and treatments.  Mullin has served patients in a majority of states, engaging both Medicare and state health authorities towards resolution of quality care issues at clinics.  Comprehensive knowledge of care issues on clinic level.  She was instrumental in getting the hearings on aging before the U.S. Senate in 2000 where she testified on patient care issue within the dialysis industry.

https://dialysisadvocates.com/committed-advocacy/

Dialysis Advocates is grateful for the opportunity to get this important message out for all Dialysis Patients.

We will be having a guest on the first part of every show. Then we will open the Microphones for the Town Hall. Patients and others will be able to discuss concerns and solutions. It will be a patient group, including fam

 

 

 

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