Author,
Chuck Frank
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 Only last week I passed through Yosemite National Park only to find, miles upon miles of blacked burned trees still standing, that were left over from the 2013 Rim Fire.  The Rim Fire, like the “let it burn” Yellowstone Fire (1988) was a complete disaster, and I believe John Muir and President Teddy Roosevelt who together created Yosemite as America’s first National Park would be asking some tough questions of why preventative measures were never put into place to protect the most beautiful park in the world for future generations.  The Rim fire, the third-largest blaze in recorded state history scorched more than 250,000 acres in and around Yosemite National Park.

“The fire also had a devastating environmental effect that biologists said probably transformed the forest for decades to come.”
The LA Tmes.

I was taken back while passing through the park and witnessed first hand the clean up “progress.”  I was appalled by the lack of restoration, while at the same time I saw no conservation measures or tree planting even taking place, nor did I see “sustainable development” as an avenue to bring back the park to its natural form.

For the record,  “sustainable development is a measure that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs…” Ref. International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)  In this instance, the catastrophic Rim Fire event and aftermath does not even come close to meeting the criteria of sustainable development because, by their own admission, (IISD) wants to preserve the environment for future generations but this is not being done with regard to the forest service’s own flawed blueprint which adversely affects not only rural public lands but forested private properties as well.


Federally forested lands and habitat are supposed to be set aside and saved for future generations but it is not happening as millions of acres are being lost every year to wildfire, and to this day, there is still no proof that “climate change” is the source of catastrophic fires, yet it is evident that a lack of preventative fire management, which includes thinning second growth trees, brushing, fuel reduction and fire breaks are all starkly missing.  Much of the problem can still be traced to the reign of President Clinton and the beginning of radical environmentalism practices that have created wildfires that are still allowed to burn.  These inferno factors were the very reasons for the Rim Fire.  Regularly blaming runaway fires on climate change is a gross overstatement and a clear departure from prevailing environmental solutions that have been noted by persons such as Dr. William Wallace Covington who obtained his Ph.D. in Forest Ecosystem Analysis from Yale University and stated to the U.S. Energy and National Resources Commission the following.

  “We are at a fork in the road.  Down one fork lies burned out, depauperate landscapes-landscapes that are a liability for future
generations.”
House of Lords: America in the Balance, Charles W. Frank, Page 103.

The Sierra Nevada is no more a victim of drought today than it was 100 years ago, all the while in previous years, forest fires were better contained because the trees were regularly being logged and forests were thinned.  Clearly, summer fires are a victim of politics and gross mismanagement that reflects a regular tactic used by environmental organizations called “sue and settle.”  For years, environmentalists, through regular lawsuits, or the threat of them are squarely to blame for a broken system with regard to forestry management.  And the voice of the people was fully ignored by those federal agencies associated with forestry practices while having mock federal hearings that were just a formality.

So, while America burns, California’s Governor Brown tells the people to expect more of the same.  So yes, with that said, we the people are at a fork in the road and this gives us one more reason to rid ourselves of the type of people that offer no hope or solutions for saving our pristine forests that were set aside for future generations.

It is true.  America is in the balance and yes, it is time to save the country.

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