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Judge Rules in Favor of Pryor Mountain Wild Horses

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Finally!

Straight from the Horse's Heart

CLAIR JOHNSON For the Independent Record

“By operating with an outdated AML when it made its 2015 decision, BLM’s excess animal determination was based, at least in part, on pure guesswork,”

A federal judge in Billings MT has ruled that the Bureau of Land Management used outdated information when it decided to remove wild horses last year as part of a population management plan at the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range.

Pryor Mountain Stallions ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation Pryor Mountain Stallions ~ photo by Terry Fitch of Wild Horse Freedom Federation

U.S. District Judge Susan Watters in a July 29 ruling said BLM’s reliance on the outdated management plan in making a decision that the range had excess horses that needed removal was “arbitrary and capricious.” Her order set aside the agency’s decision.

Watters’ ruling favored the Friends of Animals, a Connecticut-based advocacy group. The organization sued BLM last year after the agency said it would gather…

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TS Radio Whistleblowers! Marcel Reid report on the summit 2016

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TS RAdio

Join us live August 4, 2016 at 7:00 pm CST!

WB1

5:00 pm PST … 6:00pm MST … 7:00 pm CST … 8:00 pm EST

Listen live HERE!

Call in number # 917-388-4520

Hosted by Marti Oakley

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marcelWhistleblowers is presented in coordination with Marcel Reid and the Whistleblowers Summit July 27-29, 2016 in Washington D.C.

Tonight’s guest is Marcel Reid, co-founder of the Whistleblowers Summit which just concluded their annual meeting on July 29, 2016 in Washington D.C..

The three day summit included speakers with first hand experience with the waste, fraud and abuse that occurs everyday in federal agencies and organizations.  Having faced intimidation, threats and harassment as a result of blowing the whistle on these activities, many of these individuals have had their lives destroyed simply for doing their duty and reporting what they had observed.

The summit serves to give a voice to those who did the right thing but now face the grwoing threat of retaliation for doing so.  Please join us as Ms. Reid reviews this years summit.

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http://www.blogtalkradio.com/marti-oakley/2016/08/05/ts-radio-whistleblowers-marcel-reid-report-on-the-summit-2016

Lawmakers want judges to be more accountable after Stanford case

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The six-month sentence imposed by the judge in the Stanford University sexual assault case has ignited calls for greater judicial accountability and transparency in California state courts.

Among them, Assemblywoman Catharine Baker has requested an audit of the body that investigates judicial misconduct, the Commission on Judicial Performance.

The state created the Commission on Judicial Performance in 1960 as an independent agency responsible for investigating complaints against the state’s 2,175 active judges. It’s mandated to protect the public against “incompetency, misconduct or nonperformance on the bench.”

However, as the Stanford case illustrates, the public has access to little information on how the commission conducts its investigations.

The Stanford case became a national controversy when Judge Aaron Persky sentenced former student Brock Turner to six months in prison after a jury found him guilty of three sexual assault charges. Turner faced a possible 14 years in prison, but Persky said a longer sentence would have a severe impact on the former Stanford swimmer.

The commission won’t report how many complaints have been filed against Persky, even as his handling of another case draws scrutiny.

“Complaints to the commission and investigations are confidential,” said Victoria Henley, the director and chief counsel of the commission.

In requesting the audit, Baker, a Republican from San Ramon, hopes to open up a commission that has been criticized for its lack of action and lack of transparency.

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August 1, 2016: The 50th Anniversary of the Start of America’s Mass School Shooting Epidemic

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Duty to Warn

new logokohlsBy Gary G. Kohls, MD

 

And the Story of the “Clock Tower Sniper”
It is a fact that 90% of America’s school shooters were on prescription brain-altering psychiatric drugs – drugs that are well known to cause inebriation, intoxication, loss of impulse control, rage, aggression, homicidal ideation, suicidal ideation, and temporary drug-induced mania and/or psychosis.

But the well-documented psychiatric drug connections to school shootings and a host of other widely-publicized episodes of “senseless violence” has been treated as a taboo subject by Big Media, Big Pharma and the medical profession. (For much more on the connections between psych drugs and “irrational” behaviors of many types, click on http://www.globalnewscentre.com/duty-to-warn-the-red-lake-school-shootings-10th-anniversary/#sthash.TB6ZespH.dpbs.)

The first cover-up started rather innocently after August 1, 1966, when a likely drug-intoxicated (and/or drug-withdrawing) ex-Marine sharp-shooter named Charles Whitman earned his infamous title as the “Clock Tower Sniper” at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin.

Whitman was likely drug-intoxicated because of his prescribed amphetamine (Dexedrine) and barbiturate drugs, for he had been a patient of a campus physician during his second try at being a college student. (He had flunked out after his first matriculation and re-joined the Marines for a second “tour of duty”. However, he was court-martialed by the Marine Corps and re- enrolled in college.)

From Whitman’s homicide/suicide note, one only has hints of the psychological and spiritual traumas that he suffered during his child-rearing years. His biological parents had divorced, and dysfunctional families always cover up family violence so there is not much family history to research.

But Whitman wasn’t an outcast in his childhood. He had been an Eagle Scout before he went into the Marines, and seemed to have been generally well-liked, at times being described as an “all-American boy.” After the shooting spree, Whitman’s father-in-law said that he was “just as normal as anybody I ever knew, and he worked awfully hard at his grades. There was nothing wrong with him that I knew of.”

But Whitman took his prescribed Dexedrine and barbiturates, and, not surprisingly when one knows amphetamines and what withdrawal symptoms can come from the highly addictive barbiturates, he had chronic headaches. (Although a benign brain tumor was found at autopsy.) He hated his stern father, a self-made man whom Whitman was never able to please. More

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