new logoDoug Kinan

(See CHAPTER ONE: “A MEDICARE FRAUD STORY (ONE DOCTOR’S FIGHT FOR YOUR LIFE”).

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CHAPTER TWO

This is another chapter regarding the story about Dr. Bharani Padmanabhan (Dr. Bharani) who is in his fourth year of being persecuted by the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Medicine for conscientiously complying with the rules, the law, his oath as a doctor and for his opposition to Medicare fraud.

Despite the fact that the Massachusetts Attorney General has a dedicated office to combat insurance fraud, the AG’s office has filed court pleadings asking the court to dismiss Dr. Bharani’s complaint on the grounds that the alleged criminal violations Dr Bharani opposed (retaliation, felony perjury, Medicare fraud and more) are immune from prosecution.

Maura Healey Board motion declaring immunity (2)

barry levin NKDA 4 pages (2)

When the top law enforcement official in Massachusetts asks a court of law to go along with criminal activity, at the very least it’s a bad faith admission that a crime has been committed. Is any court of law in America the appropriate forum to force anyone to be silent about crime or else? Is this due process?
According to the American Medical Association “there are 920,000 physicians in the US. This is a ratio of 10 nurses to 3 physicians.”

Thus, there are approximately 4 million licensed medical professionals working in hospitals, clinics and other medical care facilities in America.

One of the most important pieces of basic medical information needed to know, (not “nice to know”), for proper patient care is whether or not any patient has any drug allergies which could severely complicate medical care and treatment and in some cases result in death.
Meet “NKDA” which means “No Known Drug Allergies” and is present on every patient’s medical chart and in their medical record for medical staff to see upon interviewing and/or meeting their patient at bedside.

“NKDA” is a critical piece of information which allows medical personnel to be able to respond to health situations and treatments calmly and proactively, and to be able to promptly avoid medical complications by inadvertently prescribing the wrong drug. For any doctor or nurse to admit not knowing what NKDA means is similar to not knowing their own name.

Accordingly, the “expert” witness who testified under oath (see attached transcript) against Dr. Bharani indicates that the odds are 4 million to one that this “expert” witness may be the only one in the entire doctor/nurse medical community in the United States that is unsure or does not know what “NKDA” means. How can this be possible and what are the implications of a medical doctor with approximately 37 years of experience not knowing what NKDA means?

After reading the transcript testimony of a doctor who now works in a teaching hospital and admits to being unaware of critical medical knowledge, perhaps the Massachusetts Board of Registration in Medicine should change their focus?

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