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new-logo25 Reader submission:

This is from Grant’s speech within the novel “The Iron Web” by Larken Rose

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Anarchy –Grant’s Speech recited by John Rand

Published on Aug 16, 2012

There is some ambiguity with the use of the terms “libertarianism” and “libertarian” in writings about anarchism. Since the 1890s from France, the term “libertarianism” has often been used as a synonym for anarchism and was used almost exclusively in this sense until the 1950s in the United States; its use as a synonym is still common outside the United States.  Accordingly, “libertarian socialism” is sometimes used as a synonym for socialist anarchism, to distinguish it from “individualist libertarianism” (individualist anarchism). On the other hand, some use “libertarianism” to refer to individualistic free-market philosophy only, referring to free-market anarchism as “libertarian anarchism”.

Anarchy (from the ancient Greek αναρχια, from αν, “not” +‎ αρχος  “ruler”, “absence of a leader”, without rulers), has more than one definition. In the United States, the term “anarchy” typically is used to refer to a society without a publicly enforced government or violently enforced political authority. When used in this sense, anarchy may or may not be intended to imply political disorder or lawlessness within a society. However, this usage is not the traditional sense of the word.
Outside of the US, and by most individuals that self-identify as anarchists, it implies a system of governance, mostly theoretical at a nation state level although there are a few successful historical examples, that goes to lengths to avoid the use of coercion, violence, force and authority, while still producing a productive and desirable society. More