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THE SEARCH FOR LIABILITY IN THE INTERNAL REVENUE CODE

The federal government has no jurisdiction over intrastate commerce because the Declaration of Independence is the organic law of the land and its main tenet is that “all men are created equal”. To make the importing of articles from the U.S. possessions fall under the foreign commerce clause, the U.S. possessions are treated as foreign countries (see 26 USC §§ 2014(g), 865(i)(3), and 872(b)(7) for examples).

The Internal Revenue Code has been written intentionally to deceive. It represents the pinnacle, the highest point, of achievement by the powers behind the bankruptcy of the United States. To learn how to read the Internal Revenue Code, one must first establish exactly what is the basis of liability.

Before beginning the navigation through the dreaded Internal Revenue Code for the source of liability, the reader should understand the fundamentals involved. If you have read the main page of this Blog, “The Social Security Scam” you will already be familiar with the fundamentals.

Fundamental #1 – internal revenue is a part of the customs. Customs gains revenue for the government by collecting importing duties from foreign countries. Internal revenue gains revenue for the government by collecting importing duties from the U.S. possessions – thus a source of “internal revenue” from the government’s point of view. In other words, internal revenue is under the foreign commerce clause.

 The Constitution in Article I, section 8 grants the federal government jurisdiction over foreign commerce, interstate commerce, and trade with the Indians. The three commerce jurisdictions are cited separately in title 28 USC, “Judiciary and Judicial Procedure”, chapter 85, “District Courts; Jurisdiction”. Section 1336, “Surface Board Transportation Orders”, which was renamed from “Interstate Commerce Commission’s Orders” in late 1995, is the interstate commerce jurisdiction. Section 1362, “Indian Tribes”, is obviously the trade with the Indians commerce jurisdiction. Section 1340, “Internal revenue; customs duties”, is the foreign commerce jurisdiction.

The federal government has no jurisdiction over intrastate commerce because the Declaration of Independence is the organic law of the land and its main tenet is that “all men are created equal”. To make the importing of articles from the U.S. possessions fall under the foreign commerce clause, the U.S. possessions are treated as foreign countries (see 26 USC §§ 2014(g), 865(i)(3), and 872(b)(7) for examples). Article IV, section 3 of the Constitution grants the federal government total jurisdiction over its own possessions and territories. READ MORE AT “How to read the Internal Revenue Code”

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