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The Matrix of Control

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Gary Rea (c)Copyright 2010 All Rights Reserved

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Our prehistoric ancestors were hunter-gatherers. They lived in and with nature, as a part of it. All of their time and efforts were spent in hunting and gathering food, creating shelter, clothing, tools and all the necessities of their survival. They were more free, in the truest sense of the word freedom, than any human beings have been since.

Some ten thousand years ago, this all began to change as humans began to cultivate wild grains and to domesticate animals. As agriculture replaced hunting and gathering, a new paradigm was entered into. No longer were humans nomadic, following the herds of animals they subsisted on. Now they were tied to the land they farmed and permanent settlements became the norm. Out of these early settlements grew the first villages, which evolved into towns, then cities, then city-states. More

Documents show vast cleanup of Plum Island land: Or did they?

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By FRANK ELTMAN (AP) – 8 hours agoGARDEN CITY, N.Y. — Government documents obtained by The Associated Press show extensive efforts since 2000 to remove vast amounts of waste and contaminants from Plum Island, site of top-secret Army germ warfare research and decades of studies of dangerous animal diseases.

Yet some environmentalists remain concerned about the secrecy surrounding the 840-acre, pork chop-shaped island off northeastern Long Island — and they’re dubious of any claims that pollution has been remedied.

“We are highly concerned that when the government acts alone they may not be doing the best job,” said Adrienne Esposito, executive director of the Citizens Campaign for the Environment. “Every government cleanup needs the public’s involvement and independent oversight to ensure its validity.”

The Department of Homeland Security is preparing to sell the island 100 miles east of Manhattan and build a new high-security laboratory in Kansas to study animal diseases.

Documents, some obtained by the AP under the Freedom of Information Law, reveal that hundreds of tons of medical waste, contaminated soil and other refuse have been shipped off the island for disposal. Other island sites have been cleaned in compliance with federal regulations, the reports indicate.

Also, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers determined in 2006 that no munitions or ordnance remain from the Army base on Plum Island that once housed as many as 4,000 troops from the Spanish-American War through World War II. And as late as 2007, New York government inspection reports said there is no environmental threat on the island. More

Agent orange, Agent White, Agent Blue and the Rainbow colors of biological warfare going on since WW2

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Air University Review, July-August 1983

Operation Ranch Hand:
Herbicides In Southeast Asia

 

It has been more than twelve years since the last Ranch Hand, herbicide mission in Southeast Asia. Although the controversy still continues perhaps enough time has passed for a retrospective evaluation of this operation. The widespread use of herbicides in Southeast Asia was a unique military operation, but examining the decisions that led to the initiation, expansion and eventual termination of Operation Ranch Hand may provide insights about the larger war of which it was a part. Its history may also be useful pattern for anticipating the course of events that the introduction of some other uncoventional tool of war in a future conflict may follow.

The term Operation Ranch Hand was the military code name for the spraying of herbicides from U.S. Air Force aircraft in Southeast Asia from 1962 through 1971. 1 The term itself had no particular signficance and was one of a number of similar code names such as Farm gate and Barn Door, which denoted specific activities early in the Vietnam War. The aircraft employed were Fairchild C-123s, and medium transports with twin piston engines that were later supplemented by two jet engines for added thrust. The Ranch Hand detachment began with six planes, dropped to two, and peaked at about 25 in 1969. It had several organizational homes over the years, but it was known during the height of its activities between 1966 and 1970 as the 12th Air Command Squadron and 12th Special Operations Squadron. In terms of personnel and aircraft, one can see that Ranch Hand was relatively minor part of Air Force operation in Southeast Asia. More

Yes Peggy, There is a Border

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Lynn Swearingen (c) copyright 2010 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Recently a friend sent me an article about a Wisconsin politician who was apparently unaware of the location of the great state of Arizona. After considering what this really meant (instead of taking for granted that the apparently this individual is willing like the majority of politicians to jump on whatever hot topic political bandwagon happens by), I wondered how one could not be aware of the fact that Arizona does share a border with Mexico and does have a small immigration issue with undocumented illegal non-certified “people of Geographically challenged birth events”. More

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