live link: AxXiom for Liberty

March 16, 2010

Communitarian Law is the new legal system used by regional and local governments affiliated with the emerging global government. This new law circumvents national law via a program of “balancing,” often implemented by a small group of self-appointed elites who achieve consensus (not voting). For Americans, the adoption of these evolving principles transports us from a constitutional system where we expect clearly defined basic rights (like due process and legal searches) to a more moral way of enforcing “social justice” that only a few upper level academics can define.

Communitarian law is the precedent that requires the courts to rule in favor of the self-defined “community” against individuals protected by constitutional law. It limits the property rights of individuals in all member nations. The most obvious current communitarian decision handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court is Kelo v. The City of New London, a land rights case that balanced property rights against comunitarian development goals. The least obvious communitarian decision handed down by the U.S. Supreme Court is Hiibel v. The State of Nevada, a privacy rights case that balanced private individual’s right to annonymity. In all U.S. communitarian legislation and criminal code, the stated purpose is to balance individual rights against community responsibilities. It’s called Reinventing Government. Based on the consensus reached by globalist do-gooders, all nations are now required to adjust their national systems. The world is in an ongoing process of internal re-inventions of national political and legal infrastructures.

http://nord.twu.net/acl/commlaw.html#two

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