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Rapid Rise in Seed Prices Draws U.S. Scrutiny

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LIVE LINK:  NEW YORK TIMES

Monsanto researchers in Stonington, Ill., are working to develop new soybean varieties that will be tolerant to agricultural herbicide and have greater yields.

By WILLIAM NEUMAN
Published: March 11, 2010

“Farmers would also be free to save seed from one year to the next, a money-saving step they are now barred from taking.”

 

During the depths of the economic crisis last year, the prices for many goods held steady or even dropped. But on American farms, the picture was far different, as farmers watched the price they paid for seeds skyrocket. Corn seed prices rose 32 percent; soybean seeds were up 24 percent. More

REPORTING ANTITRUST CONCERNS: Will the DoJ actually do something or just pull the covers up?

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Below is the DoJ center for citizen complaints regarding possible anti-trust activity.  If the recent Ankeny, Iowa meeting was any indicator of what the Justice department is willing to do to curb monopoly practices of companies such as Monsanto, we’re in the crapper.  The meeting was less about justice and more about showcasing the symbiotic relationship between government and Monsanto.  Anyway, if you feel so inclined and have verifiable information, I’m sure the DoJ would welcome your call.  But then again, since the DoJ has stood by silently for decades while this monster grew and peoples property and lives were violated by Monsanto….it makes you wonder.  Marti

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Citizens Complaint Center

REPORTING ANTITRUST CONCERNS

ANTITRUST DIVISION

Information from the public is vital to the work of the Antitrust Division. Your e-mails, letters, and phone calls could be our first alert to a possible violation of antitrust laws and may provide the initial evidence needed to begin an investigation.

To report antitrust concerns to the Antitrust Division:

If you do not think your concerns involve the antitrust laws, you may want to visit the Department of Justice site for more information or send an e-mail to AskDOJ@usdoj.gov.

Please keep in mind that the Antitrust Division is prohibited from giving legal advice to private individuals.

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An American Soldier Exposes – Kill Everybody

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One ex-soldier speaks out about the escalation of the wars.  Orders were given to “kill everybody”.   The soldiers know they were sent there on a lie; that they continue to fight a war because politicians refuse to end it.   

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqS4Vd0iD7I

The American public: Supporting unconstitutional actions?

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Quotes to remember:

Excerpted from Anthony Gregory / Independence and Liberty

“Constitutions alone cannot limit government,” writes Anthony Gregory. “The overwhelming bulk of what the federal government is engaged in, from imperial wars to drug prohibition, from Social Security to Medicare, is unauthorized by the Constitution, and yet they persist. What matters ultimately is the Constitution in the hearts and minds of the people. So long as the American public supports unconstitutional actions, such actions will commence. Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty, as Jefferson noted. The Constitution spells out great limits on the government, but without the support of the people, the document loses its teeth.”

John McCain’s Attack On Liberty

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By Chuck Baldwin

March 16, 2010

“The Dietary Supplement Safety Act of 2010 enjoys support from the most liberal members of Congress. It is an invitation for the FDA to assume broad new powers and replicate here the system now operating in Europe over dietary supplements where dietary ingredients are presumed adulterated and unlawful to sell unless pre-approved by the government”

This column is archived here:

Anyone paying attention knows that John McCain has been a Big-Government Globalist Neocon (BGGN) for virtually his entire senatorial career. As with many BGGNs hiding out in the Republican Party, McCain likes to talk about smaller government, but his track record is littered with the promotion of one big government program after another. But, what else would one expect from a member of the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)?Lately, however, McCain has outdone himself. He has introduced two bills in the US Senate that are about as Machiavellian as they could be. I am referring to S.3081, a bill that would authorize the federal government to detain American citizens indefinitely without trial, and S.3002, a bill that would authorize the federal government to regulate vitamins, minerals, and virtually all health and natural food products.

According to Examiner.com, “Last week, John McCain introduced a bill into the U.S. Senate which, if passed, would actually allow U.S. citizens to be arrested and detained indefinitely, all without Miranda rights or ever being charged with a crime.” More

Health Care Nullification and Interposition

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by Michael Boldin

When a state ‘nullifies’ a federal law or regulation, it is passing legally-binding legislation that makes the federal act in question void and inoperative, or ‘non-effective,’ within the boundaries of that state; or, in other words, not a law as far as the state is concerned.

Current nullification efforts around the U.S. have states passing laws that effectively defy federal laws and regulations on firearms, marijuana, identification cards and more. In 2010, we expect to see similar legislation in response to Health Care, No Child Left Behind, Federalization of the Guard and more.

The most asked question is – once such a law is passed, what next?

STANDING BETWEEN

In the Virginia Resolution of 1798, James Madison wrote of the principle of interposition:

That this Assembly doth explicitly and peremptorily declare, that it views the powers of the federal government, as resulting from the compact, to which the states are parties; as limited by the plain sense and intention of the instrument constituting the compact; as no further valid that they are authorized by the grants enumerated in that compact; and that in case of a deliberate, palpable, and dangerous exercise of other powers, not granted by the said compact, the states who are parties thereto, have the right, and are in duty bound, to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits, the authorities, rights and liberties appertaining to them.

Here Madison asserts what is implied in nullification laws – that state governments not only have the right to resist unconstitutional federal acts, but that, in order to protect liberty, they are “duty bound to interpose” or stand between the federal government and the people of the state. More

Fighting for Liberty = Terrorism

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By:Gary Rea (c)copyright 2010 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Well, according to the goons at London’s Gatwick Airport, fighting for liberty is now officially recognized as “terrorism.” A young man wearing a T-shirt sporting the slogan, “Freedom or Death” was told to cover his shirt because the slogan was “threatening” and “an incitement to terrorism.” That’s how far things have gone in the UK, now, and it’s looking more and more like we’re not very far behind. This makes me wonder how long it will be before the state of New Hampshire is forced to change its state motto (“Live free or die”). Actually, it’s already been suggested.

When expressions of the values our nation was founded upon become “an incitement to terrorism” and we must watch what we write or say for fear of being labeled as “terrorists,” we are already living in a police state, folks. Whether there are troops in the streets with guard dogs or not makes no difference; the effect is the same: a loss of fundamental liberty. In fact, I would say that we are living in a far more effective police state by virtue of the fact that the troops and guard dogs are not needed in order to keep us in line. We have become so spineless that just the implied threat of a government crackdown is enough to silence most people, these days.

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