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Sustainable Cowboys or Welfare Ranchers of the American West?

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Source:  THE DAILY PITCHFORK

Report analyzes taxpayer bailout of U.S. public lands ranching [Part II of a series on ranchers]

by Vickery Eckhoff

Cliven-Bundy-on-Horseback-e1423775080754-620x264 Public lands livestock operators each cost taxpayers nearly a quarter of a million dollars in subsidies over the last decade. (AP Photo/Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher)

Five hundred million dollars[1]. That’s what 21,000[2] ranchers who graze their livestock on America’s iconic western rangelands are estimated to have cost US taxpayers in 2014 — and every year for the past decade. This averages out to an annual taxpayer subsidy of $23,809 per rancher — approximately a quarter of a million dollars each since 2005. So why does this small subset, representing just 2.7% of US livestock producers, protest the “welfare rancher” label?

 The public lands grazing program is welfare.

That $23,809 — and it’s a lowball figure — is a form of public assistance similar to other welfare programs. The only difference is, it doesn’t arrive as a check in the mail. It instead represents a loss covered by taxpayers: the very large difference between what public lands ranchers pay in fees to the US government and what public lands grazing costs taxpayers every year. But it’s still a subsidy, as a newly updated economic analysis, Costs and Consequences: The Real Price of Livestock Grazing on America’s Public Lands, makes clear. And the recipients aren’t low income; a large number are millionaires and some are billionaires and multi-billion dollar corporations. Cattle barons, if you will.

Public lands ranching costs western ecosystems, wildlife and taxpayers.

“Several federal agencies permit livestock grazing on public lands in the United States, the largest being the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the Department of Agriculture’s United States Forest Service (USFS).

The vast majority of livestock grazing on BLM and USFS rangelands occurs in the 11 western states of Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.

Rangelands are non-irrigated and generally have vegetation that consists mostly of grasses, herbs and/or shrubs. They are different from pastureland, which may periodically be planted, fertilized, mowed or irrigated.”

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE HERE.

The Durbin/DeLauro Food Safety Nightmare Returns: Now They come for your Supplements and Vitamins!

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strip bannernew-logo25Marti Oakley

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DeLauro and Durbin are selling their new efforts to redefine supplements and vitamins so that only big pharma can manufacture and sell them.  They are calling it the Food Safety Act 2015.  Excuse me!  Didn’t we just do this fake food safety thing about five years ago?  The cost of this horrendously disastrous bill was billions.  Now Obama is asking for another 1.6 billion to further exacerbate the issue with a new round of fake food safety?

No, no, NOThese bills will do two things:  1) Create another monolithic, uncontrollable secretive agency that will work in favor of globalism and against American food producers, and 2) it will be used to redefine vitamins and supplements as a medicine so that this market sector can be monopolized by big pharma.

Depending on where you get your information, the supplement industry generates 28-30 billion a year in sales. BINGO! Now you know the real reason Durbin is so hell-bent on creating a new bureaucracy to facilitate the over-taking of the vitamin/supplement industry. This would make a wonderful gift to his pharmaceutical donors.

Its unfortunate that Dick Durbin and Rosa DeLauro express no concern over the injuries and deaths caused by pharmaceuticals and vaccines. These two items represent tens of thousands of deaths and permanent injuries each and every year. Instead, these two political sell-outs are working at a feverish pace to sequester the supplement industry and put it not only under control of some huge new bureaucracy, but squarely in the hands of big pharmaceutical companies.

Just imagine for a moment, if a supplement was advertised on your TV and the manufacturer said the supplement could cause homicidal, suicidal ideation. What if they went on to say the supplement could cause an increase in the likelihood of heart attack or stroke? Brain bleeds? Paralysis? Tremors? What if they admitted that the medication would cause damage to the brain? To internal organs? What if they said it could cause high blood pressure and diabetes? What if they said it could also cause death?

How long do you think that supplement would be on the market? Yet medications and vaccines are advertised hundreds of times a day; advertisements that admit the products are dangerous to take, if not outright deadly.

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Guardian’s Wild Horse Meat Story Contains 92% Bull

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Photo: Jennifer Maharry

Rated: F

Article Review:

Why You Really Should (But Really Can’t) Eat Horse Meat

the Guardian  –  Jan 09, 2015

Michael Moss’ powerful New York Times’ investigation into the United States Department of Agriculture’s Meat Animal Research Center (“U.S. Research Lab Lets Livestock Suffer In Quest For Profit”) predictably outraged readers. The collective angst came not just because of the center’s ghoulish and inept experimentation; not just because the research animals suffered to boost profits in the livestock industry; but because the public learned that taxpayers had footed the bill — and had been doing so — for fifty years.

Compare that discovery to the recent media attention given to a very similar program, one involving even more animals, conducted to boost livestock industry profits, costing even more taxpayer dollars, and degrading millions of acres of public rangelands in the American West: The Bureau of Land Management’s Wild Horse and Burros Program (WHB).

The news media regularly covers this program. Articles about wild horses appear daily, in fact. So why is the public incensed over the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Meat Animal Research Center while the WHB program goes ignored?

The difference is in the reporting. Coverage of the Meat Animal Research Center (which we review here) was initiated by government whistleblowers within the research facility. An experienced investigative reporter subsequently spent a year researching the claims, largely through Freedom of Information Act requests. Federal and corporate perspectives were handled with appropriate suspicion.

Coverage of the WHB program, on the other hand, is typically sourced almost entirely from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the industries benefiting economically from wild horse roundups: notably, private ranchers holding public grazing permits (though mining and energy development companies profit, too).

If Moss, in his reporting on the Meat Animal Research Center, had turned to the USDA’s web site and livestock producers to ask about doing research to boost industry profits, would anyone ever know about “easy-care sheep” and lambs left to perish in rainstorms courtesy of unknowing taxpayers? Of course not.

But coverage of the WHB program was dominated by those groups making money off it. David Philipps’ New York Times article (“As Wild Horses Overrun the West, Ranchers Fear Land Will Be Gobbled Up,” critiqued here) and Caty Enders’ Guardian piece (“Why You Really Should, But Really Can’t, Eat Horsemeat”) are two cases in point.

Non-industry sources comprise less than 8 percent of the articles’ collective text. The other 92 percent is all industry boilerplate. Enders’ loyalty to the ranchers’ perspective even creeps into her word choices. Notably, she uses rancher lingo to refer to wild horses, calling them “feral.” Her point of view is clear, and it’s 92% bull.

This kind of source bias would be understandable coming from a reporter for a beef industry trade publication. But Enders is a reporter for a major media outlet.

An over-reliance on federal and industry sources is problematic not just for animals, but for the consumers who eat them (and care about their welfare). Enders’ piece notably fails to answer the two questions posed in her own headline: a) why you should eat horse meat, and b) why you can’t.

One reason why you can’t eat horse meat is that some states ban it outright. The larger reason is that Congress passed an amendment banning inspections in horse slaughter plants, preventing them from opening. These facts are well documented in the media, as this January 17, 2014 NPR article exemplifies.

A bipartisan majority supported this amendment because the drugs horses routinely take are banned in food animals. Furthermore, there is no proper system in place to track these drugs, making it impossible to keep tainted horse meat out of the food chain. As a reporter, Enders should have known these facts. And reported them.

Enders’ suggestion that wild horses would be suitable alternatives is equally misinformed. For one thing, wild horses in BLM holding facilities are wormed and vaccinated (therefore not free of drugs banned in meat animals). For another, Congress prohibits the slaughter of wild horses. As a reporter, Enders should have known that, too.

Why did she not? Simple: industry, whom she relied on for her reporting, doesn’t offer this information. The only place you’ll learn about the intricacies of horse slaughter (and wild horse round-ups) is from advocacy groups: the very people Enders and Philipps gave one word of text to for every eleven it handed to ranchers and the BLM.

rapa das bestas photo_Getty_Miguel RiopaAgain, sources matter. Consider, as a final point, the dramatic photo in Enders’ piece showing wild horses fighting, one with its teeth bared and the caption, “Overcrowding on the frontiers of the American west could lead to a depletion of natural resources for wild horses.”

The photo confirms the article’s bias. The problem is that it doesn’t depict wild horses fighting over depleted natural resources in the American West at all. Rather, it was taken in Sabucedo, Spain during a 400-year-old “horse festival” called rapa das bestas, a macabre ritual in which wild horses are driven down from the mountains, wrestled to the ground to have their manes and tails trimmed, and “corralled into a village where they face aloitadores or fighters in this man vs. animal challenge – minus weapons, just bare hands and hooves.”

There’s a reason why complex topics — such as Moss’ investigation into the Meat Animal Research Center and wild horses rounded up by the BLM — require thoughtful digging and reporting. The alternative — an easy reliance on self-interested federal and industry sources — keeps the public in the dark about the inept, incomprehensible and inhumane things that the government is doing with its money. Journalists should not be abetting that corruption. They should be exposing it.

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Half of All Children Will Be Autistic by 2025, Warns Senior Research Scientist at MIT

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Lasha Darkmoon

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“The USDA added, however, that due to “cost concerns,” it did not test for residues of glyphosate. Let’s repeat that: they never tested for the active ingredient in the most widely used herbicide in the world. “Cost concerns”? How absurd—unless they mean it will cost them too much in terms of the special relationship between the USDA and Monsanto.

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Why? Evidence points to glyphosate toxicity from the overuse of monshop_deesMonsanto’s Roundup herbicide on our food. (This is what I have been warning about for a couple of years now and 30,000 supermarket items contain it. Worse yet (?) is the projected cancer increase in most of the population in the next two decades from the impeccable French studies on lab rats who ate our GMO corn.. Sadly most of the big money is all for GMO, regardless of what it does – over $100 Million was spent to defeat citizen proposals to require food to be labelled if GMO in just California, Oregon and Washington State in 2012 – 2014 and be sure to take a close look at the chart at the bottom of the article…R)

For over three decades, Stephanie Seneff, PhD, has researched biology and technology, over the years publishing over 170 scholarly peer-reviewed articles. (1). In recent years she has concentrated on the relationship between nutrition and health, tackling such topics as Alzheimer’s, autism, and cardiovascular diseases, as well as the impact of nutritional deficiencies and environmental toxins on human health. More

Jo Anne Normile, author & Pres. of Saving Baby Equine Charity, on Wild Horse & Burro Radio (Wed., 1/14/2015)

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painy

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WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015

5:00 pm PST … 6:00 pm MST … 7:00 pm CST … 8:00 pm EST

Listen Live Here!

Call in # 917-388-4520

We have a NEW 1 hour show format. More

James McCormick: Helping Veterans Succeed After Service

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painy

Join us this evening December 8th, 2014 at 7:00 pm CST More

Waste Water from Oil Fracking Injected into Clean Aquifers

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strip bannernew-logo25 Debbie Coffey   V.P. Wild Horse Freedom Federation

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I repeat, wild horses being driven to extinction by the BLM is the canary in the coal mine of what is happening on America’s public lands and to America’s water.  –  Debbie Coffey

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 Texan Cowboy Man Seated Backwards on a Steer, The Reins Tied to the Tail Clipart

SOURCE:  nbcbayarea.com

In a time when California faces an historic drought, the NBC Bay Area Investigative Unit has uncovered that state officials allowed oil and gas companies to pump billions of gallons of waste water into protected aquifers. Investigative Reporter Stephen Stock reports in a story that aired on November 14, 2014.

State officials allowed oil and gas companies to pump nearly three billion gallons of waste water into underground aquifers that could have been used for drinking water or irrigation.

Those aquifers are supposed to be off-limits to that kind of activity, protected by the EPA.

“It’s inexcusable,” said Hollin Kretzmann, at the Center for Biological Diversity in San Francisco. “At (a) time when California is experiencing one of the worst droughts in history, we’re allowing oil companies to contaminate what could otherwise be very useful ground water resources for irrigation and for drinking. It’s possible these aquifers are now contaminated irreparably.”

California’s Department of Conservation’s Chief Deputy Director, Jason Marshall, told NBC Bay Area, “In multiple different places of the permitting process an error could have been made.”

“There have been past issues where permits were issued to operators that they shouldn’t be injecting into those zones and so we’re fixing that,” Marshall added.

In “fracking” or hydraulic fracturing operations, oil and gas companies use massive amounts of water to force the release of underground fossil fuels. The practice produces large amounts of waste water that must then be disposed of. More

Antibiotic substitute found in mushrooms that grow in horse dung

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SOURCE:  Headlines & Global News

the-substance-was-found-in-grey-shag-that-grows-on-horse-dung

The substance was found in grey shag that grows on horse dung.

By Rebekah Marcarelli

Researchers discovered a new agent in horse dung-grown fungi that could be used as an antibiotic.

The protein, dubbed cospin, has the same bacteria-killing effect as antibiotics, but belong to a different biochemical class, ETH Zurich reported. The potential antibiotic substitute was found in the mushroom cap of the Coprinopsis cinerea, which grows in horse dung. More

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