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new-logo25Debbie Coffey        (c) copyright 2013 All rights reserved

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On May 23, 2013, several wranglers at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Palomino Valley facility seemed to be too lazy to saddle up their horses, so all 3 of those big boys crammed themselves into a pick-up truck and drove it around inside a pen of wild horses like they were in a Monster truck event, and what may be a government owned vehicle even fishtailed – yee haa!!  Apparently, this was supposed to have been an effort to separate out a paint horse from the other horses.

Wild horse advocate Patty Bumgarner was there and this is what she saw:

Is this BLM’s standard operating procedure?

Now, after this little joy ride failed to separate out the horse, they drove the pick-up past Patty, and one of the wranglers asked “Did you get some good pictures?”  He didn’t say this in a polite way, but in a way that seemed meant to intimidate and harass her.

It was none of this wrangler’s business if a taxpaying American, who pays his salary and for the operation and activities of this government facility (which is a public place), wants to stand there all day, every day, and take photos and/or video.

Or, isn’t this a free country anymore?

This is just one more example of not only BLM’s reckless actions around wild horses, but of an attitude towards the public that would get them fired in any other work environment.  What business do you know of where an employee could get away with treating the public rudely?   None.  And guess what BLM?   We’re NOT going to put up with it.

Bullies are brave when they think they’re anonymous, so let’s all just take a look at a photo of  these 3 yahoos:

photo by Patty Bumgarner

3 wranglers

We encourage more advocates to go as often as possible to BLM facilities to observe both the activities and the condition of the wild horses, and to take photos and video.

Patty also observed that the horses at Palomino Valley have warts near their mouths,

(photo by Patty Bumgarner)

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and noted:

“Warts can spread from one horse to another if they’re not confined.. Warts on a horse is known as papillomavirus, and they usually appear as blemishes on the face, mouth, or nose regions in younger horses.  They appear as either single warts, or as clusters of warts that have a “cauliflower” appearance. While unsightly, they usually pose no threat to the horse’s overall health and are considered merely a cosmetic blemish. In most cases, the warts will
disappear on their own, in a matter of time. But it is important to remember that warts are a viral, contagious disease and that proper steps should be taken in order to prevent them from spreading from one horse to another, especially if the horse is kept in the vicinity of other horses.

Younger horses are more susceptible to warts because they have less-efficient immune systems than older horses. Their skin also is not as tough, and they have less hair to ward off the insects that can carry the papillomavirus. The good news is that once a horse has been infected, it builds up an immunity and is less susceptible to future infections. Provided the horse is in good physical condition, has a good nutrition program, is wormed regularly, and is under good management, the warts should disappear within six to nine months.”

And what if they’re not under “good management?”

The BLM has been observed to be busy cleaning the pens at Palomino Valley.  (Has anyone ever seen warts on a wild horse in the wild?)

The BLM really needs to clean up their disrespectful attitude towards the public and immediately enforce humane handling of the wild horses and burros that they have a mandate to protect.

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