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Silicon Valley tax dollars fund elder abuse: Apathy & Negligence by Law Enforcement & District Attorney

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Linda Kincaid

Elder Advocate, California

“San Jose Police confirmed that Villa Fontana isolates several residents.  However, SJPD referred management of that abuse back to the Public Guardian, the perpetrator of the abuse.”

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Part IV (Parts 1,2 & 3 are linked below)

- Apathy & Negligence by Law Enforcement & District Attorney

ABC 7 News I-Team

San Jose Police Lieutenant Michael Knox is the first government employee to take any action on behalf of elder abuse victim Gisela Riordan.  For over two years, Gisela has been denied visitors, phone calls, and mail.  Imprisoned at Villa Fontana, she is not allowed contact with family, friends, neighbors, advocates or clergy.  Each day is like every other for Gisela, lonely and filled with despair.

Lieutenant Knox listened sympathetically to Gisela’s story.  Police Chief Chris Moore had already determined that SJPD’s ignoring false imprisonment and isolation was “consistent with Department policy.”    Knox committed to a review of the Department’s policy on ignoring mental abuse of elders.  Although a small step, it was the first positive step taken by any government employee in Santa Clara County.

Elder Abuse by the Public Guardian

Since early 2010, Gisela Riordan has been a victim of elder abuse by her conservator, the Santa Clara County Public Guardian Donald Moody.  California law clearly states that a guardian or conservator does not have authority to isolate a conservatee.  California law also states that isolation and imprisonment of elders are crimes.

However, the Public Guardian is not concerned with California law.  Moody imprisons and isolates conservatees to suit his whims.  Gisela is falsely imprisoned and unlawfully isolated at Villa Fontana, a secured residential care facility willing to violate the law in exchange for payment.

Keeping conservatees isolated simplifies the management of those individuals.  With no visitors, there are no complaints of neglect or substandard care.  No one sees bruises or other evidence of physical abuse.  No one knows if conservatees receive medical care or enough food to eat. More

Florida’s treatment of children, elderly wards is inhumane

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Bradenton Herald Bradenton.com

Published: November 15, 2012

Letters To The Editor

Florida’s mistreatment of incapacitated children is identical to its heartless care of elderly wards warehoused in institutions, as detailed in a Nov. 12 Bradenton Herald article.

Poor Marie Freyre, just a child, was brutally taken by the state hundreds of miles from her loving family to be confined to a nursing home with a known reputation of problematic care. Hours later, sweet Marie, traumatized by the separation and abrupt isolation from her family, screaming to go home, died of a heart attack.

To anyone who has ever seen a child or an elder ripped from his family, the sight and the haunting sounds are indelible in your memory. I have seen both.

In Bradenton, my 89-year-old father was taken from my arms and put into lockdown — for three weeks, with a no-contact order on him. As a state ward, no court hearing was held to release him to his family, despite Florida law requiring prompt hearings or automatic release within 72 hours.

How simple it is to follow the money trail. For this lockdown of my father, a Holocaust survivor with post-traumatic stress disorder and 456 hours in isolation, the hospital charged well over $40,000 to Medicare.

Marie’s nursing home was paid $506 a day but her stay was ended by her death, one half day after her admission.

Can a child or an elder die from state-imposed emotional trauma of isolation from her loved ones? Marie knows that for sure.

Beverly R. Newman, Ed.D.

Bradenton

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