The term psychotronic weapons refers to several systems of non-lethal weapons that use electronic and electromagnetic means to directly assault the human nervous system and brain, altering emotional states and behavior.

Invented and patented by Dr. Oliver Lowery (who appears to be working for the CIA, according to Jon Ronson, author of The Men Who Stare at Goats) in 1989, Silent Sound Spread Spectrum (SSSS), just one of these technologies (which I’ve written about previously), was used by the Department of Defense in Iraq during the Gulf War in 1991, causing the mass surrender (without a shot being fired) of thousands of Iraqi troops. This technology uses silent subliminal programming, incorporating modified EEG (electroencephalograph) patterns stored on supercomputers, which can be used to implant emotional states directly into the brain via the auditory sense over ordinary UHF television and radio carrier frequencies.

In 1974, the USSR registered its Radioson (Radiosleep) device with the Government Committee on Matters of Inventions and Discoveries of the USSR. Radioson was described as “a method of induction of sleep by means of radio waves.”

Actually, the history of electromagnetic weapons dates back to the 1930s, according to Judy Wall’s Electromagnetic Weapons Timeline. Wall, editor and Publisher of Resonance, the Newsletter of MENSA’s Bioelectromagnetics Special Interest Group, has written several articles on various aspects of psychotronic and electromagnetic weaponry, including Military Use of Silent Sound.

Other sources of information on such weapons include Cheryl Welsh, president of Citizens Against Human Rights Abuse, who has written on the subject of electromagnetic weapons and is the author of the Mind Justice website and Eleanor White, who has been a victim of remote mind control, herself.

While the military and intelligence uses of these technologies is undeniably sinister, Dr. Oliver Lowery’s silent subliminal programming technology has also seen relatively innocuous use in the private sector as self-help behavior modification products, such as those manufactured and marketed by companies like BrainSpeak, Sprudio and Subliminal Studio, which makes software you can record your own silent subliminals with. I have to wonder about the wisdom in using such products, which directly affect the brain and alter behavior.

Some psychotherapists, notably Teri Mahaney, who has contracted with the Department of Defense, among her many clients, are also using this technology, though she uses the older method of implanting audible suggestions or “affirmations,” as they’re referred to by the self-help industry. While it may have some benign and even beneficial uses, I believe the potential dangers to our safety and freedom from the misuse of this technology – which was, after all, developed for military use – far outweigh such benefits.

Though the controlled use of silent subliminal programming by individuals for their own use may be less threatening, Eleanor White has cautioned against the use of such technologies, including a technology called Voice to Skull, which has been in use by the U.S. Army as a crowd control weapon. White has written about her own experiences and those of others whom she believes are victims of what she calls “organized stalking and electronic harassment.

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